Background Resources on U.S. Nuclear Weapons Spending

Summary
A list of outside resources on U.S. spending levels on nuclear weapons and related programs.
Related Topics
Related Media and Tools
 

Nuclear Forces and Operational Support 

U.S. Department of the Air Force, Fiscal Year (FY) 2009 Budget Estimates, February 2008, vol. 2.

U.S. Department of the Air Force, Fiscal Year (FY) 2009 Budget Estimates: Research, Development, Test and Evaluation (RDT&E), Descriptive Summaries, Budget Activities 4-6, February 2008, vol. 2.

U.S. Department of the Air Force, Fiscal Year (FY) 2009 Budget Estimates: Research, Development, Test and Evaluation (RDT&E), Descriptive Summaries, Budget Activity 7, February 2008, vol. 3.

U.S. Department of the Air Force, FY 2009 Budget Estimates: Missile Procurement, Air Force, February 2008.

U.S. Department of the Air Force, FY 2009 Budget Estimates: Aircraft Procurement, Air Force, February 2008, vol. 1.

U.S. Department of the Air Force, FY 2009 Budget Estimates: Aircraft Procurement, Air Force, February 2008, vol. 2.

U.S. Department of the Air Force, Fiscal Year (FY) 2008/2009 Budget Estimates: Program 2008, February 2007.

U.S. Department of Defense, National Defense Budget Estimates for the FY 2009 Budget (Green Book—Updated), September 2008.

U.S. Department of Defense, National Defense Budget Estimates for FY 2009, March 2008.

U.S. Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, FY 2009 Budget Request to Congress, February 2008.

U.S. Department of Energy, FY 2009 Congressional Budget Request: National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of the Administration, Weapons Activities, Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation, Naval Reactors, February 2008, vol. 1.

U.S. Department of the Navy, Fiscal Year (FY) 2009 Budget Estimates: Military Personnel, Navy, February 2008.

U.S. Department of the Navy, Fiscal Year (FY) 2009 Budget Estimates: Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy, February 2008.

U.S. Department of the Navy, Fiscal Year (FY) 2009 Budget Estimates: Weapons Procurement, Navy, February 2008.

U.S. Department of the Navy, Fiscal Year (FY) 2009 Budget Estimates: Other Procurement, Navy Budget Activity 1, February 2008.

U.S. Department of the Navy, Fiscal Year (FY) 2009 Budget Estimates: Other Procurement, Navy Budget Activity 2, February 2008.

U.S. Department of the Navy, Fiscal Year (FY) 2009 Budget Estimates: Other Procurement, Navy Budget Activity 4, February 2008.

U.S. Department of the Navy, Fiscal Year (FY) 2009 Budget Estimates: Other Procurement, Navy Budget Activity 5-7, February 2008.

U.S. Department of the Navy, FY 2009 Budget Estimate: Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Navy Budget Activity 7, February 2008.

 

Deferred Environmental and Health Costs

U.S. Department of the Air Force, Fiscal Year (FY) 2009 Budget Estimates, February 2008, vol. 2.

U.S. Department of Defense, Appendix B: Environmental Management Budget Overview, Fiscal Year 2007 Annual Report to Congress.

U.S. Department of Energy, FY 2009 Congressional Budget Request: Environmental Management, Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal and Nuclear Waste Disposal, February 2008.

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2009 Annual Performance Plan and Congressional Justification.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Fiscal Year 2009: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

U.S. Department of the Interior, Budget Justifications and Performance Information: Fiscal Year 2009, Office of Insular Affairs, February 4, 2008

U.S. Department of Justice, FY 2009 Request Compared with FY 2007 Actual Obligations and FY 2008 Enacted.

U.S. Department of Justice, Radiation Exposure Compensation Program page.

U.S. Department of Justice, Civil Division: FY 2009 Performance Budget, February 2008.

 

Missile Defense

U.S. Department of the Army, Supporting Data FY 2009 Budget Estimate: Descriptive Summaries of the Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Army Appropriations, Budget Activities 4 & 5, February 2008, vol. 2.

U.S. Department of Defense, Missile Defense Agency: Fiscal Year 2009 (FY09) Budget Estimates, January 23, 2008.

U.S. Department of Defense, Missile Defense Agency Exhibit R-2 Research, Development, Test and Evaluation (RDT&E) Budget Item Justification, February 2008.

U.S. Department of Defense, Missile Defense Agency: Fiscal Year 2009 (FY09) Budget Estimates, January 23, 2008.

Sam Black and Timothy Barnes, Fiscal Year 2008 Defense Budget: Programs of Interest, Center for Defense Information.

 

Nuclear Threat Reduction

U.S. Department of the Air Force, Fiscal Year (FY) 2009 Budget Estimates: Research, Development, Test and Evaluation (RDT&E), Descriptive Summaries, Budget Activities 1-3, February 2008, vol. 1.

U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Industry and Security: FY 2009 President’s Submission.

U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Fiscal Year (FY) 2009 Budget Estimates, February 2008.

U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Fiscal Year (FY) 2009 Budget Estimates: Procurement, Defensewide, February 2008.

U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Fiscal Year (FY) 2009 Budget Estimates, Former Soviet Union Threat Reduction—Cooperative Threat Reduction Program, February 2008.

U.S. Department of Energy, FY 2009 Congressional Budget Request: National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of the Administration, Weapons Activities, Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation, Naval Reactors, February 2008, vol. 1.

U.S. Department of Energy, FY 2009 Congressional Budget Request: Energy Supply and Conservation, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Nuclear Energy, Legacy Management, February 2008, vol. 3.

U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Budget and Finance Documents.

U.S. Department of Justice, Radiation Exposure Compensation Program, Office of the President, Detailed Information on the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Assessment, September 6, 2008.

U.S. Department of Justice, FY 2009 Justification: Federal Bureau of Investigation.

U.S. Department of Labor, Employment Standards Administration: Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

U.S. Department of the Navy, FY 2009 Budget Estimate: Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Navy Budget Activities 1-3, February 2008.

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Performance Budget: Fiscal Year 2009, February 2008, vol. 24.

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Performance Budget: Fiscal Year 2008, February 2007, vol. 23.

U.S. Department of State, Congressional Budget Justification: Fiscal Year 2009.

U.S. Department of State, Summary and Highlights: International Affairs Function 50.

Jennifer Lacey, Analysis of the DHS FY2009 Budget Request for Nuclear and Biological Security Activities, Partnership for Global Security, May 1, 2008.

Jennifer Lacey, Analysis of the State Department’s FY2009 Nonproliferation Budget Request, Partnership for Global Security, April 2, 2008.

Jennifer Lacey, Analysis of the DOE’s FY2009 Nonproliferation Budget Request, Partnership for Global Security, March 20, 2008.

Raphael Della Ratta, Analysis of the DOD FY2009 Cooperative Threat Reduction Budget Request, Partnership for Global Security, March 26, 2008.

Raphael Della Ratta, Preliminary Analysis of the U.S. Department of Defense’s Fiscal Year 2009 Cooperative Threat Reduction Request, Partnership for Global Security, March 26, 2008.

 

Nuclear Incident Management

U.S. Department of the Air Force, Fiscal Year (FY) 2009 Budget Estimates, February 2008, vol. 1.

U.S. Department of the Army, Fiscal Year (FY) 2009 Budget Estimates: Operation & Maintenance, Army National Guard,” February 2008, vol. 1.

U.S. Department of Defense, Fiscal Year (FY) 2009 Budget Estimates: Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation Defense-Wide,” February 2008, vol. 2.

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, FY 2009 Annual Plan.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Fiscal Year 2009: General Departmental Management, Office of Medicare Hearings and Appeals, National Coordinators for Health Information Technology, Public Health and Social Services Emergency Fund, Health and Human Services General Provisions.

U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Budget and Finance Documents.

U.S. Department of the Navy, FY 2009 Budget Estimate: Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Navy Budget Activity 5, February 2008.

U.S. Department of the Navy, FY 2009 Budget Estimate: Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Navy Budget Activity 6, February 2008.

 

GAO Reports

U.S. Government Accountability Office, Combating Nuclear Smuggling: DHS’s Phase 3 Test Report on Advanced Portal Monitors Did Not Disclose the Limitations of the Test Results, Report GAO-08-979 (Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 2008).

U.S. Government Accountability Office, Combating Nuclear Smuggling: DHS’s Program to Procure and Deploy Advanced Radiation Detection Portal Monitors Is Likely to Exceed the Department’s Previous Cost Estimates, Report GAO-08-1108R (Washington, D.C.:U.S. Government Accountability Office, 2008).

U.S. Government Accountability Office, Combating Nuclear Smuggling: DHS Has Made Progress Deploying Radiation Detection Equipment at U.S. Ports of Entry, but Concerns Remain, Report GAO-06-389 (Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 2006).

U.S. Government Accountability Office, Combating Nuclear Smuggling: DHS’s Cost-Benefit Analysis to Support the Purchase of New Radiation Detection Portal Monitors Was Not Based on Available Performance Data and Did Not Fully Evaluate All the Monitors’ Costs and Benefits, Report GAO-07-133R (Washington, D.C.: U.S.Government Accountability Office, 2006).

U.S. Government Accountability Office, Nuclear Nonproliferation: IAEA Has Strengthened Its Safeguards and Nuclear Security Programs, but Weaknesses Need to Be Addressed, Report GAO-06-93 (Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 2005).

 

Relevant Reports by Committee Members

Matthew Bunn, Securing the Bomb 2008, Project on Managing the Atom, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, Commissioned by the Nuclear Threat Initiative, November 2008.

Matthew Bunn, Securing the Bomb 2007, Project on Managing the Atom, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, Commissioned by the Nuclear Threat Initiative, September 2007.

Robert Civiak, Observations on the U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Fiscal Year 2009 Budget Request to Congress for Nuclear Weapons Activities, Tri-Valley CAREs, February 4, 2008.

Robert Civiak, Still At It: An Analysis of the Department of Energy’s Fiscal Year 2007 Budget Request for Nuclear Weapons Activities, Tri-Valley CAREs.

Robert Civiak, America’s One-Nation Arms Race: An Analysis of the Department of Energy’s Fiscal Year 2006 Budget Request for Nuclear Weapons Activities, Tri-Valley CAREs, April 2005.

Raphael Della Ratta, Preliminary Analysis of the U.S. Department of Defense’s Fiscal Year 2009 Cooperative Threat Reduction Request, Partnership for Global Security, March 26, 2008.

Steven M. Kosiak, Spending on US Strategic Nuclear Forces: Plans & Options for the 21st Century, Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments, 2006.

Randall Larson, Our Own Worst Enemy: Asking the Right Questions About Security to Protect You, Your Family, and America (Grand Central Publishing, September 2007).

David Mosher, The Hunt for Small Potatoes: Savings in Nuclear Deterrence Forces, in Cindy Williams, ed., Holding the Line: U.S. Defense Alternatives for the 21st Century (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2001).

Stephen I. Schwartz, ed., Atomic Audit: The Costs and Consequences of U.S. Nuclear Weapons since 1940 (Washington, D.C.: Brookings Institution Press, 1998).

End of document

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Source http://carnegieendowment.org/2009/01/12/background-resources-on-u.s.-nuclear-weapons-spending/ogc

In Fact

 

45%

of the Chinese general public

believe their country should share a global leadership role.

30%

of Indian parliamentarians

have criminal cases pending against them.

140

charter schools in the United States

are linked to Turkey’s Gülen movement.

2.5–5

thousand tons of chemical weapons

are in North Korea’s possession.

92%

of import tariffs

among Chile, Colombia, Mexico, and Peru have been eliminated.

$2.34

trillion a year

is unaccounted for in official Chinese income statistics.

37%

of GDP in oil-exporting Arab countries

comes from the mining sector.

72%

of Europeans and Turks

are opposed to intervention in Syria.

90%

of Russian exports to China

are hydrocarbons; machinery accounts for less than 1%.

13%

of undiscovered oil

is in the Arctic.

17

U.S. government shutdowns

occurred between 1976 and 1996.

40%

of Ukrainians

want an “international economic union” with the EU.

120

million electric bicycles

are used in Chinese cities.

60–70%

of the world’s energy supply

is consumed by cities.

58%

of today’s oils

require unconventional extraction techniques.

67%

of the world's population

will reside in cities by 2050.

50%

of Syria’s population

is expected to be displaced by the end of 2013.

18%

of the U.S. economy

is consumed by healthcare.

81%

of Brazilian protesters

learned about a massive rally via Facebook or Twitter.

32

million cases pending

in India’s judicial system.

1 in 3

Syrians

now needs urgent assistance.

370

political parties

contested India’s last national elections.

70%

of Egypt's labor force

works in the private sector.

70%

of oil consumed in the United States

is for the transportation sector.

20%

of Chechnya’s pre-1994 population

has fled to different parts of the world.

58%

of oil consumed in China

was from foreign sources in 2012.

$536

billion in goods and services

traded between the United States and China in 2012.

$100

billion in foreign investment and oil revenue

have been lost by Iran because of its nuclear program.

4700%

increase in China’s GDP per capita

between 1972 and today.

$11

billion have been spent

to complete the Bushehr nuclear reactor in Iran.

2%

of Iran’s electricity needs

is all the Bushehr nuclear reactor provides.

78

journalists

were imprisoned in Turkey as of August 2012 according to the OSCE.

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