2011 Carnegie International Nuclear Policy Conference

March 28, 2011 – March 29, 2011 Washington, D.C.
Summary
The 2011 conference focused on new actors and new agendas, reflecting the need to develop cooperative responses to challenges being posed by changing technology, distributions of political power, interest in nuclear energy, and security conditions in key regions.
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The 2011 Carnegie International Nuclear Policy Conference focused on new actors and new agendas, reflecting the dynamism of the global nuclear order and the need to develop cooperative responses to challenges being posed by changing technology, distributions of political power, interest in nuclear energy, and security conditions in key regions. The conference explored the motivations and interests that shape the positions that emerging major powers from the developing world are taking regarding the core bargains of the nonproliferation regime. The 2011 conference also gave more prominent treatment to the responsibility of private industry in making nuclear technology safer and more secure.

Featuring new perspectives and new voices from around the globe, the conference attracted over 800 participants from more than 43 countries—including high-ranking government officials, policy and technical experts, industry leaders, academics, and journalists.

The 2011 Carnegie International Nuclear Policy Conference is made possible through the generous support of our funders. We would also like to thank the Nuclear Threat Initiative for sponsoring the closing reception.  This year, NTI is celebrating the 10th anniversary of its work to strengthen global security by reducing threats from nuclear, biological and chemical weapons. President of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Jessica Mathews, serves on the NTI board.

Program

  • Reconciling Interests

    March 28, 2011 Washington, D.C. Celso Amorim, George Perkovich

    Ambassador Celso Amorim explores how the nuclear nonproliferation regime fits into the broader dynamic of international relations.

     
  • Implications of Japan's Nuclear Disaster

    March 28, 2011 Washington, D.C. Ariel (Eli) Levite, George Apostolakis, Vallampadugai Arunachalam, Mark Hibbs, Richard Meserve, Irving Rotter

    Is the Japan nuclear disaster site-specific or does it have broader implications for the credibility and viability of nuclear energy worldwide?

     
  • Atoms for Peace

    March 28, 2011 Washington, D.C. Andreas Widl, Ariel (Eli) Levite

    The spread of nuclear power to new states highlights the importance of corporate responsibility within the nuclear industry in facilitating adherence to global standards of nuclear safety, security, and nonproliferation.

     
  • Taking Compliance Seriously: Iran and the Next Iran

    March 28, 2011 Washington, D.C. Martin Briens, Robert Einhorn, Mark Fitzpatrick, Peter Jenkins

    The Iran case shows how lacunae in nonproliferation rules regarding the definition of peaceful uses of atomic energy and the fulfillment of peaceful nuclear cooperation can complicate efforts to enforce compliance in a rule-based system.

     
  • Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty: What Now?

    March 28, 2011 Washington, D.C. Rebecca Johnson, Vallampadugai Arunachalam, Timothy Morrison, Andreas Persbo

    What are the prospects for Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty ratification in the United States and other countries required for the treaty to enter into force?

     
  • Safeguarding the Nuclear Renaissance

    March 28, 2011 Washington, D.C. Pierre Goldschmidt, Jill Cooley, Olli Heinonen, Roger Howsley

    How should the International Atomic Energy Agency manage the growing safeguards workload?

     
  • Deep Reductions: Stability at Low Numbers

    March 28, 2011 Washington, D.C. Franklin Miller, James M. Acton, Alexei Arbatov, Bin Li

    Do the United States and Russia have unique deterrence requirements, or can other nuclear-armed sates provide a model for them?

     
  • Destination Unknown: Where is the Global Nuclear Fuel Cycle Heading?

    March 28, 2011 Washington, D.C. Mark Hibbs, Stephen Goldberg, Mujid Kazimi, Philip Sewell

    What fuel cycle technologies will dominate the commercial nuclear world a generation from now?

     
  • Nuclear Risk Reduction in South Asia After Mumbai

    March 28, 2011 Washington, D.C. Peter Lavoy, Michael Krepon, Vipin Narang, Moeed Yusuf

    India and Pakistan nearly went to war in 2001-2002 and faced another crisis after the 2008 attacks in Mumbai, India. What steps can be taken to prevent nuclear escalation in South Asia?

     
  • Keynote: Senator Jon Kyl

    March 29, 2011 Washington, D.C. Jon Kyl

    The United States needs realistic policies to confront 21st century threats, potentially including maintaining the stability of a strong nuclear deterrent.

     
  • Innovating Nuclear Governance

    March 29, 2011 Washington, D.C. Deepti Choubey, Ariel (Eli) Levite, Oliver Thränert, William Walker

    Many observers feel that the nuclear order is breaking down or failing to keep up with technological developments and the emergence of new powers. What alternatives are there for strengthening nuclear governance?

     
  • U.S. Nuclear Cooperation: How and With Whom?

    March 29, 2011 Washington, D.C. Mark Hibbs, Hamad Alkaabi, Scott Snyder, Richard Stratford

    Should the U.S. impose limitations on fuel cycle activities when negotiating new bilateral nuclear cooperation agreements?

     
  • Two Triads: India-Pakistan-China and China-U.S.-Russia

    March 29, 2011 Washington, D.C. Toby Dalton, Hua Han, Syed Rifaat Hussain, Sergey Rogov, Ashley J. Tellis

    The U.S., Russia, and China drive each other’s nuclear requirements. China and Pakistan drive India’s nuclear requirements, and India’s capabilities, now augmented by U.S. and other foreign assistance, play back on Pakistan and China.

     
  • A Middle East WMD Free Zone Conference: Preparing for Success

    March 29, 2011 Washington, D.C. Alison Kelly, Shlomo Brom, Seyed Hossein Mousavian, Khaled Shamaa

    What steps, and by which actors, are necessary to enable a successful conference on the establishment of a Middle East Weapons of Mass Destruction Free Zone?

     
  • Extended Deterrence and the 21st Century

    March 29, 2011 Washington, D.C. Paul Schulte, Ken Jimbo, Lukasz Kulesa, Sinan Ülgen

    In the 20th century, extended deterrence helped prevent proliferation, but in the 21st century, will it impede nonproliferation and disarmament?

     
  • The Future of the Nuclear Suppliers Group

    March 29, 2011 Washington, D.C. Joan Rohlfing, John Carlson, Richard Goorevich, Henk Cor van der Kwast

    The Nuclear Suppliers Group, the world's most comprehensive nuclear trade rule-making organization, faces a number of challenging decisions.

     
  • Darkness Before Dawn? The Future of Pakistan

    March 29, 2011 Washington, D.C. Javed Jabbar

    Western media reporting often obscures a more nuanced understanding of the complexity of Pakistani society and the factors which are likely to shape a positive and stable future for the country.

     
  • What's Next After New START

    March 29, 2011 Washington, D.C. Linton Brooks, Rose Gottemoeller, Sergey Kislyak

    U.S. and Russian officials with responsibility for arms control discuss what is next on the arms control agenda and how the administrations in Moscow and Washington intend to pursue progress toward disarmament.

     
  • Keynote: Thomas Donilon

    March 29, 2011 Washington, D.C. Thomas Donilon

    Where is the Obama administration's nuclear agenda two years after the Prague speech, one year after the Washington Nuclear Security Summit, and after the challenging ratification of the New START Treaty?

     

About the Nuclear Policy Program

The Carnegie Nuclear Policy Program is an internationally acclaimed source of expertise and policy thinking on nuclear industry, nonproliferation, security, and disarmament. Its multinational staff stays at the forefront of nuclear policy issues in the United States, Russia, China, Northeast Asia, South Asia, and the Middle East.

 
Source carnegieendowment.org/2011/03/29/2011-carnegie-international-nuclear-policy-conference/tbu

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