The Arab Awakening One Year On: What Kind of Partner Can Europe Be?

Merete Bilde, Nathan J. Brown, Stefan Lehne, Marina Ottaway, Marc Pierini, Paul Salem, Margaritis Schinas, Asaf Siniver, Jan Techau, Jean-Claude Thébault, Sinan Ülgen March 15, 2012 Brussels
Summary
A year has passed since the first uprisings in Tunisia spurred a fundamental change in the dynamics of Europe’s southern neighborhood, creating a host of domestic and external challenges for the region and its neighbors.
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A year has passed since the first uprisings in Tunisia spurred a fundamental change in the dynamics of Europe’s southern neighborhood. The Arab Awakening has spurred political development, but also created a host of domestic and external challenges and raised a number of critical questions for the region and its neighbors.

Where does Europe stand on the democratic transitions occurring across the Arab world? How useful has Western support to these countries been during the uprisings and what lessons has the West learned?

At a conference organized by Carnegie Europe and the Bureau for European Policy Advisers (BEPA) Directorate-General of the European Commission, two panels of experts tackled these questions and discussed how to best leverage opportunities and navigate risks in current and future relations between Europe and the Arab world.

Source carnegieendowment.org/2012/03/15/arab-awakening-one-year-on-what-kind-of-partner-can-europe-be/a6lb
 
 
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