Demystifying the Chinese Economy

Uri Dadush, Justin Lin, Vikram Nehru, Nicholas Lardy May 2, 2012 Washington, D.C.
Summary
Since opening up to the world in 1979, China’s economy has grown by an astonishing 10 percent, on average, in real terms every year. But many observers have pointed out that China’s recent “rise” is more aptly deemed a “return” to the preeminence it enjoyed before the eighteenth century.
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Since opening up to the world in 1979, China’s economy has grown by an astonishing 10 percent, on average, in real terms every year. In a matter of years—or at most two decades—it will likely surpass the U.S. economy in size. But many observers have pointed out that China’s recent “rise” is more aptly deemed a “return” to the preeminence it enjoyed before the eighteenth century. How did China decline from one of the most technologically advanced countries before the Industrial Revolution to one of the poorest in the following two-and-a-half centuries? To what extent has China become a market-based economy, and what lies ahead?

Discussing his recently published book, Demystifying the Chinese Economy, World Bank Chief Economist Justin Lin offered insight into these questions and the lessons that China’s experience holds for other countries in economic transition. Carnegie’s Vikram Nehru and Nicholas Lardy of the Peterson Institute for International Economics offered their perspectives. Carnegie’s Uri Dadush moderated.

About the Asia Program

The Carnegie Asia Program in Beijing and Washington provides clear and precise analysis to policy makers on the complex economic, security, and political developments in the Asia-Pacific region.

 

About the International Economics Program

The Carnegie International Economics Program monitors and analyzes short- and long-term trends in the global economy, including macroeconomic developments, trade, commodities, and capital flows, drawing out their policy implications. The current focus of the program is the global financial crisis and its related policy issues. The program also examines the ramifications of the rising weight of developing countries in the global economy among other areas of research.

 
Source carnegieendowment.org/2012/05/02/demystifying-chinese-economy/a9ug

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