U.S.-China Coal Value Chain Exchange Conference

Kevin Jianjun Tu, David Burwell March 7, 2013 Washington, DC
Summary
China and the United States are the world’s two largest coal producing economies and account together for more than 60 percent of global coal consumption.
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China and the United States are the world’s two largest coal producing economies and account together for more than 60 percent of global coal consumption. Rising coal consumption and imports in China, especially, pose important energy, environmental, and climate challenges not only domestically, but also for the rest of the world.

Carnegie’s Energy and Climate Program hosted the U.S.-China Coal Value Chain Exchange Conference. A full-day exchange examined how to clean the Chinese coal value chain, the management of coal in the United States, barriers and opportunities to U.S.-China coal collaboration, and how to move the coal agenda forward.

Program

  • How to Clean the Chinese Coal Value Chain

    March 7, 2013 Washington, DC Jessica Tuchman Mathews, Kevin Jianjun Tu, Ma Linwei, Qiang Liu, Fuqiang Yang

    Despite its negative impacts on air, water, and land resources, coal currently is and will continue to be a key component in the Chinese energy composition.

     
  • The Management of Coal in the United States

    March 7, 2013 Washington, DC David Burwell, Carlos Fernandez Alvarez, Scott Smouse, Ailun Yang

    With low natural gas prices marginalizing the once prominent place of coal in American energy sources, domestically produced coal in the United States may find future markets abroad.

     
  • Luncheon Keynote Address

    March 7, 2013 Washington, DC David Burwell, J. Stapleton Roy

    Former U.S. Ambassador J. Stapleton Roy provided an enlightened vision of the Chinese-American relationship and advocates the advancement of a strategically sustainable and mutually beneficial partnership for the 21st century.

     
  • U.S.-China Collaboration on Coal: Barriers and Opportunities

    March 7, 2013 Washington, DC Dadi Zhou, Casey Delhotal, Michael Reid, Nan Zhou, Wang Tao

    As the United States reduces its coal consumption and China increases its own, opportunities for technologically and policy cooperation on this great transition abound.

     
  • How to Move the Coal Agenda Forward

    March 7, 2013 Washington, DC Fuqiang Yang, Daniel Guttman, Jennifer Turner

    As both China and the United States move into new administrations, each leader is given an opportunity to move the coal agenda forward.

     

About the Energy and Climate Program

The Carnegie Energy and Climate Program engages global experts working on issues relating to energy technology, environmental science, and political economy to develop practical solutions for policymakers around the world. The program aims to provide the leadership and the policy framework necessary to minimize the risks that stem from global climate change and to reduce competition for scarce resources.

 
Source carnegieendowment.org/2013/03/07/coal-value-chain-exchange-and-climate-solutions-conference/flm6

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