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TENTATIVE Agenda

Panel times, titles, and speakers are subject to change. 
 

MONDAY, April 8, 2013
7:30 a.m.
Amphitheater Foyer
Registration and Continental Breakfast
7:45 a.m. – 8:45 a.m.

Horizon
Side Briefings

I: BMD and the Nuclear Reset
Hosted by the Carnegie Moscow Center

Moderator
Steven Pifer, Brookings Institution 

Speaker
Alexei Arbatov, Carnegie Moscow Center
Polaris

II: Women of Mass Destruction: Women in Technology and International Security Breakfast Discussion
Hosted by the U.S. Department of State and the Carnegie Nuclear Policy Program 


Speaker
Rose Gottemoeller, Acting Under Secretary of State for Arms Control and International Security

Proliferation Café III: Fukushima Nuclear Accident: Shortcomings of Safety Regulation and Lessons Learned 
Hosted by the Rebuild Japan Initiative Foundation 

Moderator
Kay Kitazawa, Rebuild Japan Initiative Foundation

Speaker
Gregory Jaczko, former Chairman, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission
Kazuto Suzuki, Hokkaido University and Princeton University
M.V. Ramana, Princeton University
9:00 a.m. – 9:05 a.m.
Amphitheater
Welcome and Opening Remarks
Toby Dalton, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
9:05 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.
Amphitheater
Morning Keynote: Yukiya Amano
Director General, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

Discussion: Mark Fitzpatrick, International Institute for Strategic Studies
10:15 a.m. – 10:40 a.m. Break
Morning Plenary
10:40 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. 
Amphitheater
Prague 2.0? Deterrence, Disarmament, and Nonproliferation in Obama's Second Term 

Moderator

George Perkovich, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

Speakers
Alexei Arbatov, Carnegie Moscow Center
Rose Gottemoeller, U.S. Department of State
Yao Yunzhu, Academy of Military Science, China
12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.
Atrium Ballroom
Luncheon Keynote: Allison Macfarlane
Chairman, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

Discussion: Matthew Wald, New York Times
Afternoon Concurrent Panels
1:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Horizon
I: Humanitarian Dimensions of Nuclear War, Deterrence and Disarmament

Moderator
Nina Tannenwald, Brown University

Speakers
Elbridge A. Colby, Center for Naval Analyses
Benno Laggner, Swiss Federal Department of Foreign Affairs
Li Bin, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
Amphitheater II: Too Little Disarmament, Too Much Nonproliferation?

Moderator
Scott Sagan, Stanford University

Speakers
Christopher Ford, U.S. Senate Committee on Appropriations
Alfredo Labbé, permanent representative of Chile to the IAEA
Harald Müller, Peace Research Institute Frankfurt
Polaris III: Proliferation Implications of New Fuel Cycle Technologies 

Moderator
Jeffrey Lewis, James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies

Speakers
Soon Heung Chang, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology
Nancy Jo Nicholas, Los Alamos National Laboratory
Francis Slakey, American Physical Society
3:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. Break
Late-Afternoon Concurrent Panels
3:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Horizon
I: Deterring Cyber and Space-Based Threats

Moderator 
Linton Brooks, former administrator, National Nuclear Security Administration

Speakers
Sergey Rogov, Russian Academy of Sciences
Xu Weidi, National Defense University, China
Amphitheater II: Are Treaties like FMCT and CTBT Still Vital? 

Moderator
Deepti Choubey, Nuclear Threat Initiative 

Speakers
Christoph Eichhorn, Federal Foreign Office, Germany 
Maleeha Lodhi, former Ambassador of Pakistan to the United States 
William Potter, James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies
Polaris III: Whither Nuclear Power? 

Moderator 
Oliver Morton, Economist 

Speakers
Mark Hibbs, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

Gürkan Kumbaroğlu, Boğaziçi University
M.V. Ramana, Princeton University
5:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
Atrium Ballroom
Welcome Reception
TUESDAY, April 9, 2013
7:30 a.m.
Amphitheater Foyer
Registration and Continental Breakfast
7:45 a.m. – 8:45 a.m.

Horizon

Side Briefings

I: Iran's Nuclear Odyssey: Costs and Risks

Hosted by the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace 

Speakers
Ali Vaez, International Crisis Group
Karim Sadjadpour, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

Polaris II: The Importance of Track II Diplomacy for Arms Control and Nonproliferation: Measuring Success and Recommendations for Action 
Hosted by the National Academy of Sciences, Committee on International Security and Arms Control (CISAC) 

Moderator 
Micah Lowenthal, CISAC

Speakers
Frank Klotz, CISAC member, Council on Foreign Relations
Ambassador Linton Brooks, CISAC member, former Administrator, National Nuclear Security Administration
Proliferation Café III: Nuclear Weapons and U.S.-China Relations: A Way Forward 
Hosted by the Center for Strategic and International Studies Project on Nuclear Issues 

Speakers
Elbridge A. Colby, Center for Naval Analyses 
John Warden, Center for Strategic and International Studies
Morning Plenaries
9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
Amphitheater
Morning Keynote: M.J. Chung
Member, National Assembly of the Republic of Korea

Discussion: Douglas Paal, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

10:00 a.m. – 11:10 a.m.
Amphitheater

Managing Nuclear Power Post-Fukushima 

Opening Remarks
Daniel Poneman, U.S. Deputy Secretary of Energy

Speakers
Tatsujiro Suzuki, Japan Atomic Energy Commission
George Felgate, World Association of Nuclear Operators
11:10 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. Break
Morning Concurrent Panels
11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.
Polaris
I: What Nuclear Weapons Can the United States Afford? 

Moderator
Walter Pincus, Washington Post

Speakers
Barry Blechman, Stimson Center
Eric Edelman, Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments
Garrett Harencak, Major GeneralUnited States Air Force
David Mosher, Congressional Budget Office
Amphitheater II: Arab Spring and Middle East WMDFZ

Moderator
David Ignatius, Washington Post

Speakers
Shahram Chubin, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
Dore Gold, Jerusalem Center for Public Affairs
Mahmoud Karem, Egyptian Council of Foreign Affairs
1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.
Atrium Ballroom
Lunch
Afternoon Concurrent Panels
2:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Horizon
I: Is There an "Emerging Power" Agenda? 

Moderator
Togzhan Kassenova, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

Speakers
Matias Spektor, Fundação Getulio Vargas, Brazil 
Sinan Ülgen, Carnegie Europe
Nirupama Rao, Ambassador of India to the United States
Amphitheater II: Extended Deterrence: Defining the U.S. Reassurance Requirement

Moderator
Brad Roberts, former deputy assistant secretary of defense for nuclear and missile defense policy
                                     
Speakers
Łukasz Kulesa, Polish Institute of International Affairs
Jiří Šedivý, Permanent Representative of the Czech Republic to NATO 
Koji Tomita, Embassy of Japan to the United States
Polaris

III: Proliferation and Regime Change 

Moderator
Ellen Laipson, Stimson Center

Speakers
Antonio Guerriero, Permanent Representative of Brazil to the Conference on Disarmament 
Bijan Khajehpour, Atieh International, Austria 
Danielle Pletka, American Enterprise Institute
Bruno Tertrais, Fondation Pour la Recherche Stratégique

3:30 p.m. – 3:50 p.m. Break
Afternoon Plenary
3:50 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Amphitheater
Assessing the Efficacy of Sanctions for Nonproliferation
Carl Bildt, minister for foreign affairs, Sweden

Discussion: Meghan O'Sullivan, Harvard University
5:00 p.m. – 5:05 p.m.
Amphitheater
Closing Remarks
5:05 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.
Amphitheater Foyer
Closing Reception

 

End of document
Source http://carnegieendowment.org/2013/04/09/agenda/ffpt

In Fact

 

45%

of the Chinese general public

believe their country should share a global leadership role.

30%

of Indian parliamentarians

have criminal cases pending against them.

140

charter schools in the United States

are linked to Turkey’s Gülen movement.

2.5–5

thousand tons of chemical weapons

are in North Korea’s possession.

92%

of import tariffs

among Chile, Colombia, Mexico, and Peru have been eliminated.

$2.34

trillion a year

is unaccounted for in official Chinese income statistics.

37%

of GDP in oil-exporting Arab countries

comes from the mining sector.

72%

of Europeans and Turks

are opposed to intervention in Syria.

90%

of Russian exports to China

are hydrocarbons; machinery accounts for less than 1%.

13%

of undiscovered oil

is in the Arctic.

17

U.S. government shutdowns

occurred between 1976 and 1996.

40%

of Ukrainians

want an “international economic union” with the EU.

120

million electric bicycles

are used in Chinese cities.

60–70%

of the world’s energy supply

is consumed by cities.

58%

of today’s oils

require unconventional extraction techniques.

67%

of the world's population

will reside in cities by 2050.

50%

of Syria’s population

is expected to be displaced by the end of 2013.

18%

of the U.S. economy

is consumed by healthcare.

81%

of Brazilian protesters

learned about a massive rally via Facebook or Twitter.

32

million cases pending

in India’s judicial system.

1 in 3

Syrians

now needs urgent assistance.

370

political parties

contested India’s last national elections.

70%

of Egypt's labor force

works in the private sector.

70%

of oil consumed in the United States

is for the transportation sector.

20%

of Chechnya’s pre-1994 population

has fled to different parts of the world.

58%

of oil consumed in China

was from foreign sources in 2012.

$536

billion in goods and services

traded between the United States and China in 2012.

$100

billion in foreign investment and oil revenue

have been lost by Iran because of its nuclear program.

4700%

increase in China’s GDP per capita

between 1972 and today.

$11

billion have been spent

to complete the Bushehr nuclear reactor in Iran.

2%

of Iran’s electricity needs

is all the Bushehr nuclear reactor provides.

78

journalists

were imprisoned in Turkey as of August 2012 according to the OSCE.

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