Inside Lashkar-e-Taiba

Frederic Grare, C. Christine Fair, Don Rassler, Nadia Shoeb, Anirban Ghosh April 22, 2013 Washington, DC
Summary
Lashkar-e-Taiba (LeT), a Pakistani terrorist organization best known for the high-profile November 2008 attack in Mumbai, has established itself as one of the most feared groups in the region.
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Lashkar-e-Taiba (LeT), a Pakistani terrorist organization best known for the high-profile November 2008 attack in Mumbai, has established itself as one of the most feared groups in the region. The speakers at this event will provide an inside account of the group’s development and workings drawing on a recently published study, The Fighters of Lashkar-e-Taiba: Recruitment, Training, Deployment, and Death. C. Christine Fair, Don Rassler, Nadia Shoeb, and Anirban Ghosh discussed LeT and considered broader lessons for policy approaches to countering violent extremism. Carnegie’s Frederic Grare moderated.

About the South Asia Program

The Carnegie South Asia Program informs policy debates relating to the region’s security, economy, and political development. From the war in Afghanistan to Pakistan’s internal dynamics to U.S. engagement with India, the Program’s renowned team of experts offer in-depth analysis derived from their unique access to the people and places defining South Asia’s most critical challenges.

 
Source carnegieendowment.org/2013/04/22/inside-lashkar-e-taiba/fz4r

Comments (3)

 
 
  • Muhammad Naeem
    In childhood a proverb which was not understandable at that time was " Might is right." Now , I believe that it was an extract of centuries experience. If somebody with strong military and economy says that his opponents are terrorist ,everyone will believe. Being not an extremist and fundamentalist , I would like to say that " the survival for the fittest " policy should be changed by the enlightened society, intellectuals and civillised segment of the population. By using a specs of prejudice or selling one's intelligence for a few pennies is regrettable. A staunched believer in humanity should always keep in mind the betterment and well being of people . This idea occurred to me by studying different articles . Is this way is the policy of Carnegie Endowment or not I do'nt know but I could not help myself to jot down the feeling I perceived .
     
     
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  • Muhammad Naeem
    Although the facts and findings are true at some extent , it looks customary to also show the other side of the mirror . The writer is of course with vast horizon and a professional iconic personality but please let us know who will tell us about hazards of military hegemony , industrialization s abuse and the atrocities committed by the developed nations. It is regretful that almost every learned writer or scholar has mentioned the ills of the poor masses of the world. Nobody likes to throw light on the sobbing humanity, social justice at global level and continuously deteriorating poverty in the world. Are we after values or interests ? Have we contributed our part for the humanity ?
     
     
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  • Nazia khan
    The event should have featured Mr. Arif Jamal, one of the authors of the report and a credible Pakistan expert.
     
     
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