Perilous Desert: Security Challenges in the Sahara and Sahel

Anouar Boukhars, Frederic Wehrey, Marwan Muasher May 22, 2013 Washington, DC
Summary
While the world’s attention was fixed on the momentous events in Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya after the outbreak of the Arab Awakening, the desert states to the south were undergoing their own transformations with major global implications.
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While the world’s attention was fixed on the momentous events in Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya after the outbreak of the Arab Awakening, the desert states to the south were undergoing their own transformations with major global implications. Long overlooked by policymakers and scholars, the broader Sahara region has always possessed an underappreciated geopolitical significance. And changes should not be ignored. To explore regional sources of instability and what can be done to minimize the threat of simmering conflicts, Carnegie gathered top experts from the United States, Europe, and the region at an all-day conference to mark the launch of the new book Perilous Desert: Insecurity in the Sahara. The conference was held under Chatham House Rules.

About the Middle East Program

The Carnegie Middle East Program combines in-depth local knowledge with incisive comparative analysis to examine economic, sociopolitical, and strategic interests in the Arab world. Through detailed country studies and the exploration of key crosscutting themes, the Carnegie Middle East Program, in coordination with the Carnegie Middle East Center in Beirut, provides analysis and recommendations in both English and Arabic that are deeply informed by knowledge and views from the region. The program has special expertise in political reform and Islamist participation in pluralistic politics.

 
Source carnegieendowment.org/2013/05/22/book-launch-perilous-desert-insecurity-in-sahara/fzzd

Comments (1)

 
 
  • C Cochran
    I'm amazed that in this day and age, the conference organizers were unable to identify a single female expert on this topic. Would you think it strange if a conference were 100% female with the exception of one female moderator? If so, why do you think drawing from only male scholars will result in a rich, lively, ground-breaking discussion? It's so disappointing that even the Carnegie is still an all-boys club.
     
     
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