Toby Dalton

Nuclear Policy Program
Dalton is the co-director of the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment. An expert on nonproliferation and nuclear energy, his research focuses on cooperative nuclear security initiatives and the management of nuclear challenges in South Asia and East Asia.


PhD, George Washington University 
MA, University of Washington 
BA, Occidental College


English; German


Toby Dalton is co-director of the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment. An expert on nonproliferation and nuclear energy, his research focuses on cooperative nuclear security initiatives and the management of nuclear challenges in South Asia and East Asia.

Dalton is author of “Beyond Incrementalism: Rethinking Approaches to CBMs and Stability in South Asia” (Stimson Center, 2013); co-author with Jaclyn Tandler of the Carnegie Paper “Understanding the Arms ‘Race’ in South Asia”; and co-author with Mark Hibbs and George Perkovich of the Carnegie Policy Outlook “A Criteria-Based Approach to Nuclear Cooperation with Pakistan.”

From 2002 to 2010, Dalton served in a variety of high-level positions at the U.S. Department of Energy, including acting director for the Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security and senior policy adviser to the Office of Nonproliferation and International Security on issues relating to International Atomic Energy Agency safeguards, the nonproliferation regime, and a range of countries, such as Pakistan, India, China, North Korea, and Israel. He also established and led the department’s office at the U.S. embassy in Pakistan, managing critical bilateral and multilateral nonproliferation issues and overseeing the implementation of U.S. nonproliferation and counterproliferation initiatives.

Dalton previously served as professional staff member to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, a Luce Scholar at the Institute for Far Eastern Studies in Seoul, a research associate at the National Bureau of Asian Research, and a project associate for the Carnegie Nuclear Policy Program.

He has authored numerous op-eds and journal articles and contributed to the books Understanding New Political Realities in Seoul: Working toward a Common Approach to Strengthen U.S.-Korea Relations (the Maureen and Mike Mansfield Foundation, 2008) and The Future of U.S.-Korea-Japan Relations: Balancing Values and Interests (CSIS, 2002).

  • Op-Ed Council on Foreign Relations September 16, 2015
    Will South Korean Nuclear Leadership Make a Difference in 2016?

    South Korea will chair several major meetings of the international nonproliferation regime in the coming years. Will this drive the country to develop its nuclear expertise?

  • The Stimson Center and the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace August 27, 2015
    A Normal Nuclear Pakistan

    Pakistan’s military leadership can choose to accept success in achieving a “strategic” deterrent against India, or it can choose to continue to compete with India in the pursuit of “full spectrum” deterrence.

  • Op-Ed Dawn August 27, 2015
    Nuclear Mainstream

    Pakistan’s path to join the mainstream of the international nuclear order faces many obstacles.

  • August 6, 2015
    Parsing the Iran Deal

    An analysis of the Iran deal from a nonproliferation perspective.

  • Council on Foreign Relations June 24, 2015
    Nuclear Governance: South Korea’s Efforts to Strengthen Regimes and Frameworks for the Safe and Secure Use of Nuclear Energy

    South Korea stands in a unique position among the global nuclear elite: it is the top user of nuclear power that is not also a nuclear weapon state.

  • Washington Quarterly May 22, 2015
    Modi’s Strategic Choice: How to Respond to Terrorism from Pakistan

    There are many ways to make Pakistani military leaders conclude that the cohesion, security, and progress of their own country will be further jeopardized if they fail to act vigorously to prevent terrorism against India.

  • Op-Ed Dong-A Ilbo April 22, 2015
    How South Korea Can Take Advantage of Nuclear Cooperation With the United States

    Any interpretation that pits Washington and Seoul against each other fails to understand the fundamental spirit of cooperation that reaffirms and undergirds the U.S.-ROK nuclear relationship.

  • Op-Ed Council on Foreign Relations and the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies March 30, 2015
    The Future of U.S.-ROK Nuclear Cooperation

    Judging the new bilateral nuclear cooperation agreement between Korea and the United States solely on single issues obscures the very broad benefits it delivers to both Korea and the United States.

  • Op-Ed Asia Policy January 22, 2015
    South Korea’s Search for Nuclear Sovereignty

    The narrow technical disagreements stalling the renegotiation of the U.S.–South Korea nuclear cooperation agreement mask a far larger and more complicated set of issues and interests that challenge both the future of bilateral nuclear cooperation and the nonproliferation regime.

  • Op-Ed Diplomat August 29, 2014
    Leadership Needed to Solve India-Pakistan Conflict

    It is the job of heads of government to build political coalitions in favor of reconciliation and to lead their nations through the inevitable setbacks and violent opposition that are likely to befall a peace process before it succeeds.

  • Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars March 29, 2012
    Securing 'Loose Nukes'

    Different regional actors had different agendas and priorities for the recent Seoul Nuclear Security Summit.


Nuclear Policy Conference 2015

Areas of Expertise

Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
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