Toby Dalton

Deputy Director
Nuclear Policy Program
Dalton is the deputy director of the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment. An expert on nonproliferation and nuclear energy, his research focuses on cooperative nuclear security initiatives and the management of nuclear challenges in South Asia and East Asia.
 

Education

PhD Candidate, George Washington University 
MA, University of Washington 
BA, Occidental College

Languages

English; German

 

Toby Dalton is deputy director of the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment. An expert on nonproliferation and nuclear energy, his research focuses on cooperative nuclear security initiatives and the management of nuclear challenges in South Asia and East Asia.

Dalton is author of “Beyond Incrementalism: Rethinking Approaches to CBMs and Stability in South Asia” (Stimson Center, 2013); co-author with Jaclyn Tandler of the Carnegie Paper “Understanding the Arms ‘Race’ in South Asia”; and co-author with Mark Hibbs and George Perkovich of the Carnegie Policy Outlook “A Criteria-Based Approach to Nuclear Cooperation with Pakistan.”

From 2002 to 2010, Dalton served in a variety of high-level positions at the U.S. Department of Energy, including acting director for the Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security and senior policy adviser to the Office of Nonproliferation and International Security on issues relating to International Atomic Energy Agency safeguards, the nonproliferation regime, and a range of countries, such as Pakistan, India, China, North Korea, and Israel. He also established and led the department’s office at the U.S. embassy in Pakistan, managing critical bilateral and multilateral nonproliferation issues and overseeing the implementation of U.S. nonproliferation and counterproliferation initiatives.

Dalton previously served as professional staff member to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, a Luce Scholar at the Institute for Far Eastern Studies in Seoul, a research associate at the National Bureau of Asian Research, and a project associate for the Carnegie Nuclear Policy Program.

He has authored numerous op-eds and journal articles and contributed to the books Understanding New Political Realities in Seoul: Working toward a Common Approach to Strengthen U.S.-Korea Relations (the Maureen and Mike Mansfield Foundation, 2008) and The Future of U.S.-Korea-Japan Relations: Balancing Values and Interests (CSIS, 2002).

  • Op-Ed Diplomat August 29, 2014
    Leadership Needed to Solve India-Pakistan Conflict

    It is the job of heads of government to build political coalitions in favor of reconciliation and to lead their nations through the inevitable setbacks and violent opposition that are likely to befall a peace process before it succeeds.

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  • Op-Ed National Interest June 3, 2014
    India and Pakistan: A Thin Line Between War and Peace

    The challenge for Indians and Pakistanis—and for the U.S. government, which inevitably would be impelled to mediate a new conflict—is to take steps now to prevent major terrorist attacks on India and to prepare modalities to manage consequences if prevention fails.

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  • Op-Ed Force August 5, 2013 中文
    Strategic Triangle

    The instability in South Asia can be best understood in triangular terms, with China at the apex and India and Pakistan at the end points of the base.

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  • Reading Into South Korea’s Nuclear Debate
    Op-Ed Pacific Forum CSIS March 18, 2013 中文
    Reading Into South Korea’s Nuclear Debate

    For denizens of the southern half of the Korean Peninsula, North Korea's third nuclear test was so threatening that it has moved onto center stage a once-fringe debate about whether South Korea should acquire nuclear weapons of its own.

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  • Other Publications Stimson Center January 30, 2013
    Beyond Incrementalism: Rethinking Approaches to CBMs and Stability in South Asia

    India and Pakistan need more than incremental steps toward peace and stability in South Asia—they must also make symbolic leaps.

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  • Article November 8, 2012
    Good News From Iraq

    Good news from the Middle East is rare these days. But Iraq's ratification of its Additional Protocol safeguards agreement with the International Atomic Energy Agency is certainly something to celebrate.

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  • Paper September 13, 2012
    Understanding the Arms "Race" in South Asia

    India and Pakistan are entangled in a long-standing security competition, but they are chasing vastly different goals—and certainly aren't locked in an arms race.

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  • Proliferation Analysis June 14, 2012
    Nuclear Suppliers Group: Don't Rush New Membership

    The Nuclear Suppliers Group should take time to consider the implications of India's possible membership before deciding.

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  • Op-Ed Hill May 7, 2012
    An Opening For Better U.S.-Pakistan Relations

    Pakistani legislators announced new guidelines for engagement with the United States and NATO that ban, among other conditions, future American drone strikes inside Pakistan. While the new constraints will handicap international counterterrorism efforts in the short term, they signal an important beneficial shift in Pakistani civil-military relations over the long run.

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  • Other Publications Asia Policy January 30, 2012
    Kims, Kims, And Nothing But The Kims

    With nuclear weapons a strategic necessity for Pyongyang and central to its identity, it is unlikely that North Korea was ever serious about using them as a bargaining chip.

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  • Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars March 29, 2012
    Securing 'Loose Nukes'

    Different regional actors had different agendas and priorities for the recent Seoul Nuclear Security Summit.

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Source: http://carnegieendowment.org/experts/index.cfm?fa=expert_view&expert_id=578

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