Branko Milanovic

Adjunct Scholar
Milanovic is a lead economist in the World Bank's research department,where he has been working on the topics of income inequality and globalization. Previously, he was a World Bank country economist for Poland and a research fellow at the Institute of Economic Sciences in Belgrade.
 

Education

M.S., Florida State University; Ph.D., Belgrade University

Languages

French; Russian; Serbo-Croatian

Resources

 

This person is no longer with the Carnegie Endowment.

Branko Milanovic is a lead economist in the World Bank's research department,where he has been working on the topics of income inequality and globalization. Previously, he was a World Bank country economist for Poland and a research fellow at the Institute of Economic Sciences in Belgrade. Since 1996, Milanovic has also served as a visiting professor teaching the economics of transition at the Johns Hopkins University's School for Advanced International Studies. He received his Ph.D. in economics in 1987 from Belgrade University.

As a senior associate on a two-year assignment with the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace's Global Policy Program, Milanovic focused his research on globalization and world income distribution, as well as the interaction between politics, reform, and inequality in transition countries. He remained an adjunct scholar with the Endowment until early 2010.

Selected Publications: Worlds Apart: Measuring International and Global Inequality (Princeton, 2005); Income and Influence: Social Policy in Emerging Economies, with Ethan Kapstein (Russell Sage, 2002); Inequality and Poverty During the Transition From Market Economy (World Bank, 1998).

  • Two Views on the Cause of the Global Crisis
    Op-Ed YaleGlobal May 5, 2009
    Two Views on the Cause of the Global Crisis

    While analysts can quibble over the contributing factors to the financial meltdown, a deeper, more fundamental problem was the real cause: income inequality.

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  • Op-Ed Yale Global Online October 9, 2008 中文
    Global Crisis: How Far to Go? Part I

    Although no one can yet predict the full implications of the financial crisis, it may have a silver lining for the U.S. if it is able to maintain its position of power while learning valuable lessons in humility. In the future, the U.S. may be more cautious about taking on massive debt, less reckless with its military spending, and more willing to cooperate on global problems.

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  • Op-Ed YaleGlobal February 11, 2008
    Developing Countries Worse Off Than Once Thought

    When new estimates of purchasing power parity were released last December, economic understanding of the world suddenly shifted: incomes in many emerging economies are significantly lower than previously thought. Branko Milanovic explains how this revelation will greatly affect our comprehension of poverty, global inequality, and the speed of economic growth.

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  • Op-Ed YaleGlobal November 2, 2007
    Globalization and the Corrupt States

    It's become a cliché that globalization has brought both pain and gain. But in the general painting of the dark side of globalization, one aspect is frequently ignored: intensified trade and travel have enabled the rise of corrupt states that thrive on illegal businesses. Only by changing the rules of the global trade that allowed corrupt states to grow can this blot on globalization be removed.

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  • Milanovic
    Op-Ed Yale Global Online August 29, 2006
    Why Globalization Is in Trouble

    Two fears drive the West's unease with globalization: The first is a fear of job loss due to competition from low-wage countries. The second is the fear of ethnic and cultural dilution due to increased immigration.

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  • Op-Ed Taipei Times February 12, 2006
    Learning About Globalization By Watching A Soccer Game
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  • Other Publications December 1, 2005
    Global Income Inequality: What It Is and Why It Matters?

    globeIn an upcoming paper in World Economics, “Global Income Inequality: What It Is and Why It Matters?” Branko Milanovic outlines the meaning of global inequality - inequality between the world’s citizens.  Milanovic explores the limits of our ability to measure global inequality, and the thorny challenges of assessing whether inequality has changed over the years, whether globalization has impacted the gap between the global rich and poor, and how extreme world inequality might ever be changed through global governance. 

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  • Paper Carnegie Endowment October 5, 2005
    Why Did the Poorest Countries Fail to Catch Up?

    Despite the promises made by globalization, in the last twenty years the world's poorest countries have fallen further behind the rich. In a new Carnegie Paper, Branko Milanovic debunks current development theories that explain why poorer countries have not reaped the rewards of global economic integration.

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  • Policy Outlook Carnegie Endowment January 25, 2005 中文
    Political Alternation, Regardless of Ideology, Diminishes Influence Buying: Lessons from Transitions in Former Communist States

    The most direct way to break the grip of inefficient, self-serving interests on state power is through the election of new political players not beholden to the same interest groups that supported their predecessors. This is true regardless of political bent and is demonstrated by recent history in postcommunist Eastern Europe.

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  • Book Review April 5, 2008
    Saving the Planet: The answer is...

    Jeffrey Sachs's new book is the author's blueprint for how global society should solve mankind's most pressing problems: climate change, shortage of water, excessive population growth (compared to energy and food capacity of the Earth), diseases (including AIDS), poverty and U.S. foreign policy. The way to solve them is through international co-operation, led by the rich countries.

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  • Panelists
    November 2, 2006
    Is Globalization Headed for the Rocks?

    Discussants addressed the challenges posed by globalization and the policies and institutions that will be needed to overcome them.

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  • January 27, 2006 Washington, D.C.
    Why Have the Poorest Countries Failed to Develop?

    Despite the promises made by globalization, in the last twenty years the world’s poorest countries have fallen further behind the rich. At a Carnegie event, Branko Milanovic and Sanjay Reddy of Columbia University discussed why the poorest countries have not caught up.  

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  • September 28, 2005 Washington, D.C.
    Worlds Apart: Book Discussion

    The Carnegie Endowment recently hosted a discussion with Branko Milanovic, Francois Bourguignon (World Bank) and Thomas Pogge (Columbia University) on Milanovic's new book, Worlds Apart

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Source: http://carnegieendowment.org/experts/index.cfm?fa=expert_view&expert_id=208

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