Russia and Eurasia

The Carnegie Russia and Eurasia Program has, since the end of the Cold War, led the field on Eurasian security, including strategic nuclear weapons and nonproliferation, development, economic and social issues, governance, and the rule of law.
 
In the spotlight
 

The Dangers of Inflexibility

Fundamental disagreements over Ukraine must not jeopardize U.S.-Russian cooperation on important issues of mutual interest, such as counterterrorism and nonproliferation.

Putin Will Not Accept Defeat

Kyiv and Moscow are on a collision course. They may already be past the point of no return where a negotiated solution might have kept the crisis from escalating.

Why Haven’t We Talked to Putin?

Neither sanctions against Russia nor military aid to Ukraine can resolve the current crisis. The best option for U.S. policymakers is to engage with Putin and his inner circle—if it’s not too late.

Ukraine and the Aftermath of the Downing of Flight MH17

An independent inquiry into the Malaysia Airlines plane crash over eastern Ukraine and an immediate ceasefire by all sides could be the first step in a process to reverse the trend toward mutual destruction within Ukraine and beyond.

Exploring Uzbekistan’s Potential Political Transition

Though it is still too early to talk about the chances specific candidates have of replacing Uzbekistan’s President Islam Karimov, it is important to look closely at the current ruling elite and the president’s possible successors to see where the country might be heading.

Is There a Solution?

Ukraine’s position as an important transport corridor for Russian gas has resulted in various periods of conflict between Ukraine and Russian-state owned gas companies. But, even though both recognize they will not reach a long-term agreement quickly, one can easily see that the number of disagreements between them is not great. Both realize the need to compromise.

Midsummer Blues

MH17 may well be a turning point in the Ukraine conflict, but President Putin remains unlikely to back down despite economic pressure from the West. Russians may look back to the summer of 2014 years from now as a game changer.

The Ukraine Crisis and the Resumption of Great-Power Rivalry

The Ukraine crisis has brought an end to the post–Cold War status quo in Europe. The ensuing conflict will last long and have an impact far beyond Europe.

 
  • Op-Ed
    Putin Has Fought His Way Into a Corner
    Lilia Shevtsova September 29, 2014 Financial Times Русский

    By turning Russia into a war state, President Putin has unleashed a process he cannot stop and made himself hostage to suicidal statecraft.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Azerbaijan Doesn’t Want To Be Western
    Thomas de Waal September 26, 2014 Foreign Affairs

    Azerbaijan now deems itself powerful enough to chart a third way, in which it adopts a Russia-style authoritarian model, while positioning itself as a so-called “strategic partner” with the West on energy issues and security.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Moscow Clearly Has the Advantage Over the EU
    Balázs Jarábik September 24, 2014 Bridging Europe

    Ukraine’s further development will have a large influence on EU-Russia relations and, given the tremendous economic and social challenge Kyiv faces, Ukraine will likely remain a hot topic for both the EU and Russia.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Hot Water in Ukraine
    Balázs Jarábik September 23, 2014 Foreign Affairs

    Ukraine needs more than the current level of Western assistance. But the Ukrainian government also needs to pull its weight, promising (and delivering) transparency.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Ukraine Needs Money Not Arms
    Eugene Rumer September 18, 2014 Financial Times

    Ukraine does not need extra arms to fight a war that it cannot win and that can only prolong its suffering. What it needs is economic aid.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Russia-West Rivalry Over Ukraine Is Higher Priority Than Security
    Pavel Koshkin, Dmitri Trenin September 15, 2014 Russia Direct

    Even a threat like Islamic terrorism won’t force Russia and the Unites States to make security collaboration a higher priority than geopolitical rivalry over Ukraine.

     
  • Op-Ed
    West’s Antics Pushing Russia Closer to China
    Dmitri Trenin September 12, 2014 China Daily

    The apparently long-term rupture of Russia’s relations with the West offers an opportunity to China to enhance its already close relationship with the Kremlin and thus turn the global geopolitical balance in its favor.

     
  • Op-Ed
    What’s Worse Than Vladimir Putin?
    Eugene Rumer September 12, 2014 POLITICO Magazine

    If current hostilities endure and sanctions grow more painful, it is possible that the next Russian leader could be even more anti-Western and recalcitrant than Putin is.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Give Diplomacy With Russia a Chance
    Jack F. Matlock Jr., Thomas R. Pickering, James Collins September 8, 2014 New York Times 中文

    The crisis over Ukraine has all but frozen official communication between the United States and Russia. It is time to reengage Russia diplomatically.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Putin Ends the Interregnum
    Lilia Shevtsova August 28, 2014 American Interest

    Vladimir Putin’s increasingly reckless interventions in Ukraine should force the West to reevaluate everything it thought it knew about the collapse of the Soviet Union and the past two decades of Western policy on Russia.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Putin Has Fought His Way Into a Corner
    Lilia Shevtsova September 29, 2014 Financial Times Русский

    By turning Russia into a war state, President Putin has unleashed a process he cannot stop and made himself hostage to suicidal statecraft.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Azerbaijan Doesn’t Want To Be Western
    Thomas de Waal September 26, 2014 Foreign Affairs

    Azerbaijan now deems itself powerful enough to chart a third way, in which it adopts a Russia-style authoritarian model, while positioning itself as a so-called “strategic partner” with the West on energy issues and security.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Moscow Clearly Has the Advantage Over the EU
    Balázs Jarábik September 24, 2014 Bridging Europe

    Ukraine’s further development will have a large influence on EU-Russia relations and, given the tremendous economic and social challenge Kyiv faces, Ukraine will likely remain a hot topic for both the EU and Russia.

     
  • Event
    Trends in Armenia’s Politics
    Thomas de Waal, Sergey Minasyan September 24, 2014 Washington, DC

    Armenia has not been immune to the recent turmoil affecting the post-Soviet space and this summer saw the worst flare-up on the Line of Contact between Armenian and Azerbaijani forces since 1994.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Hot Water in Ukraine
    Balázs Jarábik September 23, 2014 Foreign Affairs

    Ukraine needs more than the current level of Western assistance. But the Ukrainian government also needs to pull its weight, promising (and delivering) transparency.

     
  • TV/Radio Broadcast
    Ukrainian President Asks for Military Aid at U.S. Congress
    Andrew S. Weiss September 18, 2014 KCRW’s To The Point

    What the Ukrainians really want from the West right now is lethal military assistance and they are just not going to get it.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Ukraine Needs Money Not Arms
    Eugene Rumer September 18, 2014 Financial Times

    Ukraine does not need extra arms to fight a war that it cannot win and that can only prolong its suffering. What it needs is economic aid.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Russia-West Rivalry Over Ukraine Is Higher Priority Than Security
    Pavel Koshkin, Dmitri Trenin September 15, 2014 Russia Direct

    Even a threat like Islamic terrorism won’t force Russia and the Unites States to make security collaboration a higher priority than geopolitical rivalry over Ukraine.

     
  • Op-Ed
    West’s Antics Pushing Russia Closer to China
    Dmitri Trenin September 12, 2014 China Daily

    The apparently long-term rupture of Russia’s relations with the West offers an opportunity to China to enhance its already close relationship with the Kremlin and thus turn the global geopolitical balance in its favor.

     
  • Op-Ed
    What’s Worse Than Vladimir Putin?
    Eugene Rumer September 12, 2014 POLITICO Magazine

    If current hostilities endure and sanctions grow more painful, it is possible that the next Russian leader could be even more anti-Western and recalcitrant than Putin is.

     

Eurasia Outlook

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Al-Farabi Carnegie Program on Central Asia

Carnegie Moscow Center

Carnegie Experts on Russia and Eurasia

  • Alexei Arbatov
    Scholar in Residence
    Nonproliferation Program
    Moscow Center

    Arbatov, a former member of the State Duma, is the author of a number of books and numerous articles and papers on issues of global security, strategic stability, disarmament, and Russian military reform.

  •  
  • Bayram Balci
    Nonresident Scholar
    Russia and Eurasia Program

    Balci is a nonresident scholar in Carnegie’s Russia and Eurasia Program, where his research focuses on Turkey and Turkish foreign policy in Central Asia and the Caucasus.

  •  
  • James Collins
    Senior Associate, Russia and Eurasia Program;
    Diplomat in Residence

    Ambassador Collins was the U.S. ambassador to the Russian Federation from 1997 to 2001 and is an expert on the former Soviet Union, its successor states, and the Middle East.

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  • Thomas de Waal
    Senior Associate
    Russia and Eurasia Program

    De Waal is a senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment, specializing primarily in the South Caucasus region comprising Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia and their breakaway territories as well as the wider Black Sea region.

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  • Balázs Jarábik
    Visiting Scholar
    Russia and Eurasia Program

    Jarábik is a visiting scholar focusing on Ukraine and Eastern Europe.

  •  
  • Alexey Malashenko
    Scholar in Residence
    Religion, Society, and Security Program
    Moscow Center

    Malashenko is the chair of the Carnegie Moscow Center’s Religion, Society, and Security Program. He also taught at the Higher School of Economics from 2007 to 2008 and was a professor at the Moscow State Institute of International Relations from 2000 to 2006.

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  • Eugene Rumer
    Director and Senior Associate
    Russia and Eurasia Program

    Rumer, a former national intelligence officer for Russia and Eurasia at the U.S. National Intelligence Council, is a senior associate and the director of Carnegie’s Russia and Eurasia Program.

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  • Lilia Shevtsova
    Senior Associate
    Russian Domestic Politics and Political Institutions Program
    Moscow Center

    Shevtsova chairs the Russian Domestic Politics and Political Institutions Program at the Carnegie Moscow Center, dividing her time between Carnegie’s offices in Washington, DC, and Moscow. She has been with Carnegie since 1995.

  •  
  • Petr Topychkanov
    Associate
    Nonproliferation Program
    Moscow Center

    Topychkanov is an associate in the Carnegie Moscow Center’s Nonproliferation Program.

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  • Dmitri Trenin
    Director
    Moscow Center

    Trenin, director of the Carnegie Moscow Center, has been with the center since its inception. He also chairs the research council and the Foreign and Security Policy Program.

  •  
  • Andrew S. Weiss
    Vice President for Studies

    Weiss is vice president for studies at the Carnegie Endowment, where he oversees research in Washington and Moscow on Russia and Eurasia.

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