Russia

 
  • Strategic Europe
    The Islamic State and Russia Should Be a Chance for Europe
    Judy Dempsey March 26, 2015

    Islamic State terrorism and Russian belligerence should be catalysts for strengthening security, defense, and other forms of cooperation throughout Europe.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    Ukraine: The Kingdom of the Oligarchs
    Balázs Jarábik March 25, 2015

    Prospects for Ukraine’s long-term success and cohesion will be determined by its ability to pursue far-reaching reforms to modernize the state and to check the power of the oligarchs.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    A Chechen Dragon Splits Moscow
    Thomas de Waal March 25, 2015

    The Chechen connection to the Nemtsov’s murder has split the ruling elite. Putin’s problem is that Kadyrov has completely cleared Chechnya of all rivals, either Chechen or Russian—having fed and groomed his “dragon,” he has no Plan B in Chechnya.

     
  • Strategic Europe
    The Slow Erosion of Gazprom’s Grip Over Europe
    Judy Dempsey March 23, 2015

    It is the European Commission’s competition arm, not European leaders, that is behind Gazprom’s waning hold on Europe’s energy sector.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    Long Live Minsk II?
    Balázs Jarábik March 20, 2015

    The Minsk agreements are fragile.How effectively they are implemented will depend primarily on the Europeans’ ability to convince Moscow to pressure separatists into observing the ceasefire, and on Kyiv’s ability to keep nationalist militias in line. If either side fails to do so, the fighting is likely to resume.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    Imitating Chavez: A Year of Nationalization in Crimea
    Andrey Sambros March 19, 2015 Русский

    Although it began with state-owned assets, the nationalization project in Crimea quickly consumed Ukrainian and Russian private property. One year on, every significant Crimean enterprise is in the hands of local authorities, and there is little hope for privatization.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    Will the Chechen Connection Lead to Ramzan Kadyrov?

    Putin and Kadyrov resemble Siamese twins, whose separation will result in complication for both of them, and thus for the country at large. Neither one of them stood to benefit from Boris Nemtsov’s death.

     
  • Strategic Europe
    The European Endowment for Democracy Goes Russian
    Judy Dempsey March 16, 2015

    The Kremlin’s clampdown on the media and sophisticated propaganda machine are giving the European Endowment for Democracy a new sense of focus.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    Who Benefits From Ending Russian-Ukrainian Cooperation in the Space and Defense Sectors?
    Vladimir Dvorkin March 16, 2015

    The Russian government’s decision to end cooperation with Ukraine on two space launch programs is likely due to political motivations alone and goes against the economic and technological interests of Russia, Ukraine, and many other countries. This decision is worth reconsidering.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    The Chechen Connection?

    It is impossible to imagine Ramzan Kadyrov calling his subordinates and directly instructing them to commit the murder of Boris Nemtsov. However, the xenophobia and fear of the West characteristic of some segments of Russia’s Muslim community, including Muslims in the North Caucasus, creates a favorable climate for such acts.

     
  • Event
    Oil-Climate Index Release
    William Burns, Deborah Gordon, Jonathan Koomey, Adam Brandt, Joule Bergerson, Rob Barnett, David Livingston March 11, 2015 Washington, DC

    Oil is changing. The oils themselves, how they are extracted and processed, and the products into which they are made are shifting in substantial ways.

     
  • Event
    Maidan Film Screening
    Max Seddon, Philip Shishkin February 25, 2015 Washington, DC

    Maidan is a 2014 documentary from the acclaimed Ukrainian director Sergei Loznitsa. From a protest to a movement to a full-scale revolution, the film chronicles the events that took place on Independence Square in Kyiv last winter.

     
  • Event
    Conflict in Ukraine
    Rajan Menon, Eugene Rumer, David Hoffman February 20, 2015 Washington, DC

    The current conflict in Ukraine has spawned the most serious crisis between Russia and the West since the end of the Cold War.

     
  • Event
    Russia and the West: What Next?
    Dmitri Trenin December 16, 2014 Moscow

    In 2014, Russia broke out of the post–Cold War order and openly challenged the U.S.-led international system. The new period of rivalry between the Kremlin and the West is likely to endure for years.

     
  • Event
    U.S.-China-Russia Trilateral Security Relations
    Tong Zhao, Richard Weitz, Xu Jian December 5, 2014 Beijing

    Opposing views on issues like ballistic missile defense and tactical nuclear weapons complicate, but should not preclude, trilateral security cooperation between Washington, Beijing, and Moscow.

     
  • Event
    Silver Bullet? Asking the Right Questions About Conventional Prompt Global Strike—Presentation of the Russian Edition
    James M. Acton, Eugene Miasnikov, Petr Topychkanov November 19, 2014 Moscow

    As the world powers develop non-nuclear weapons that can strike distant targets in a short period of time (Conventional Prompt Global Strike, or CPGS, weapons), it is important to raise awareness of this issue, while not trying to advocate for or against such weapons.

     
  • Event
    Rising Tensions in the North Caucasus
    Thomas de Waal, Sergey Markedonov, Sufian Zhemukhov November 5, 2014 Washington, DC

    The North Caucasus may be out of the headlines, but it remains the most turbulent part of the Russian Federation.

     
  • Event
    National Insecurity
    David Rothkopf, Joshua Bolten, Zbigniew Brzezinski, Brent Scowcroft October 30, 2014 Washington, DC

    From the Middle East to Eastern Europe, crises grip the globe. A growing group of rivals and dangerous non-state actors now pose an array of new threats to the international order.

     
  • Event
    Exploring the Prospects for Russian-Turkish Cooperation
    Dmitri Trenin, Memduh Karakullukçu, Nigar Ağaoğulları, Ümit Pamir, Alexey Malashenko, Evgeny Buzhinsky, Irina Zvyagelskaya, Pavel Shlykov October 16, 2014 Moscow

    Russia and Turkey share many important interests, providing them with opportunities for valuable collaboration and cooperation in their common neighborhood, which stretches from the South Caucasus and the Levant to Central Asia and Afghanistan.

     
  • Event
    The Prospects for EU/Germany-Russia Relations
    Ulrich Speck, Petr Topychkanov September 29, 2014 Moscow

    The current conflict between the European Union and Russia is a clash between a postmodern world, in which states prefer to use soft power to achieve their foreign policy goals, and a modern one, in which the use of force in foreign policy is considered acceptable.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Vladimir Putin’s Ebbing Power
    Moisés Naím March 26, 2015 Fortune

    The Russian president helped build his country’s aspirational middle class. It may ultimately be his undoing.

     
  • Strategic Europe
    The Islamic State and Russia Should Be a Chance for Europe
    Judy Dempsey March 26, 2015

    Islamic State terrorism and Russian belligerence should be catalysts for strengthening security, defense, and other forms of cooperation throughout Europe.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    Ukraine: The Kingdom of the Oligarchs
    Balázs Jarábik March 25, 2015

    Prospects for Ukraine’s long-term success and cohesion will be determined by its ability to pursue far-reaching reforms to modernize the state and to check the power of the oligarchs.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    A Chechen Dragon Splits Moscow
    Thomas de Waal March 25, 2015

    The Chechen connection to the Nemtsov’s murder has split the ruling elite. Putin’s problem is that Kadyrov has completely cleared Chechnya of all rivals, either Chechen or Russian—having fed and groomed his “dragon,” he has no Plan B in Chechnya.

     
  • Op-Ed
    A Blast From the Past
    Andrei Kolesnikov March 23, 2015 The New Times Русский

    Putin stated that the Russian leadership was ready to use nuclear forces in the days of the Crimean annexation, bringing back the old treat of nuclear war.

     
  • Strategic Europe
    The Slow Erosion of Gazprom’s Grip Over Europe
    Judy Dempsey March 23, 2015

    It is the European Commission’s competition arm, not European leaders, that is behind Gazprom’s waning hold on Europe’s energy sector.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    Long Live Minsk II?
    Balázs Jarábik March 20, 2015

    The Minsk agreements are fragile.How effectively they are implemented will depend primarily on the Europeans’ ability to convince Moscow to pressure separatists into observing the ceasefire, and on Kyiv’s ability to keep nationalist militias in line. If either side fails to do so, the fighting is likely to resume.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Taming the Dragon: How Can Russia Benefit From China’s Financial Ambitions in the SCO?
    Alexander Gabuev March 19, 2015 Russia in Global Affairs Русский

    Russia should give the green light to the establishment of an SCO Development Bank where China takes dominant positions in the authorized capital and management bodies. In exchange, Moscow could coordinate investment principles on terms that would be most favorable to itself and its partners.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    Imitating Chavez: A Year of Nationalization in Crimea
    Andrey Sambros March 19, 2015 Русский

    Although it began with state-owned assets, the nationalization project in Crimea quickly consumed Ukrainian and Russian private property. One year on, every significant Crimean enterprise is in the hands of local authorities, and there is little hope for privatization.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Broken Ukraine
    Paul Stronski March 18, 2015 Foreign Affairs

    The rise of an ungoverned, violent Donbass—which had a prewar population of six million—is likely to be one of the war’s most important lasting legacies.

     

Eurasia Outlook

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Euro-Atlantic Security Initiative

The Fight for Influence: Russia in Central Asia

Carnegie Experts on Russia

  • Alexei Arbatov
    Scholar in Residence
    Nonproliferation Program
    Moscow Center

    Arbatov, a former member of the State Duma, is the author of a number of books and numerous articles and papers on issues of global security, strategic stability, disarmament, and Russian military reform.

  •  
  • Alexander Baunov
    Senior Associate
    Editor in Chief of Carnegie.ru
    Moscow Center

    Baunov is a senior associate at the Carnegie Moscow Center and editor in chief of Carnegie.ru.

  •  
  • James Collins
    Senior Associate, Russia and Eurasia Program;
    Diplomat in Residence

    Ambassador Collins was the U.S. ambassador to the Russian Federation from 1997 to 2001 and is an expert on the former Soviet Union, its successor states, and the Middle East.

  •  
  • Thomas de Waal
    Senior Associate
    Russia and Eurasia Program

    De Waal is a senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment, specializing primarily in the South Caucasus region comprising Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia and their breakaway territories as well as the wider Black Sea region.

  •  
  • Alexander Gabuev
    Senior Associate and Chair
    Russia in the Asia-Pacific Program
    Moscow Center

    Gabuev is a senior associate and the chair of the Russia in the Asia-Pacific Program at the Carnegie Moscow Center.

  •  
  • Andrei Kolesnikov
    Senior Associate and Chair
    Russian Domestic Politics and Political Institutions Program
    Moscow Center

    Kolesnikov is a senior associate and the chair of the Russian Domestic Politics and Political Institutions Program at the Carnegie Moscow Center.

  •  
  • Stefan Lehne
    Visiting Scholar
    Carnegie Europe

    Lehne is a visiting scholar at Carnegie Europe in Brussels, where his research focuses on the post–Lisbon Treaty development of the European Union’s foreign policy, with a specific focus on relations between the EU and member states.

  •  
  • Alexey Malashenko
    Scholar in Residence
    Religion, Society, and Security Program
    Moscow Center

    Malashenko is the chair of the Carnegie Moscow Center’s Religion, Society, and Security Program. He also taught at the Higher School of Economics from 2007 to 2008 and was a professor at the Moscow State Institute of International Relations from 2000 to 2006.

  •  
  • Jessica Tuchman Mathews
    Distinguished Fellow

    Mathews is a distinguished fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. She served as Carnegie’s president for 18 years.

  •  
  • Carole Nakhle
    Nonresident Scholar
    Middle East Center

    Nakhle is a nonresident scholar at Carnegie Middle East Center, specializing in international petroleum contracts and fiscal regimes for the oil and gas industry, world oil and gas market developments, energy policy, and oil and gas revenue management.

  •  
  • Eugene Rumer
    Director and Senior Associate
    Russia and Eurasia Program

    Rumer, a former national intelligence officer for Russia and Eurasia at the U.S. National Intelligence Council, is a senior associate and the director of Carnegie’s Russia and Eurasia Program.

  •  
  • Maxim Samorukov
    Deputy Editor of Carnegie.ru
    Moscow Center

    Samorukov is deputy editor of Carnegie.ru.

  •  
  • Gwendolyn Sasse
    Nonresident Associate
    Carnegie Europe

    Sasse is a nonresident associate at Carnegie Europe. Her research focuses on Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, EU enlargement, and comparative democratization.

  •  
  • Paul Stronski
    Senior Associate, Russia and Eurasia Program

    Paul Stronski is a senior associate in Carnegie’s Russia and Eurasia Program, where his research focuses on the relationship between Russia and neighboring countries in Central Asia and the South Caucasus.

  •  
  • Petr Topychkanov
    Associate
    Nonproliferation Program
    Moscow Center

    Topychkanov is an associate in the Carnegie Moscow Center’s Nonproliferation Program.

  •  
  • Dmitri Trenin
    Director
    Moscow Center

    Trenin, director of the Carnegie Moscow Center, has been with the center since its inception. He also chairs the research council and the Foreign and Security Policy Program.

  •  
  • Andrew S. Weiss
    Vice President for Studies

    Weiss is vice president for studies at the Carnegie Endowment, where he oversees research in Washington and Moscow on Russia and Eurasia.

  •  

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