United States

 
  • Eurasia Outlook
    European Perspectives of the “New Turkey”
    Pavel Shlykov December 24, 2014

    President Erdogan strives to find a sound strategy to minimize the current risks in foreign affairs. Despite resentment of the EU and the current stagnation of Turkey’s accession process, the EU retains its influence over Turkey because of the Turkish economy’s great dependence on the EU.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    The Iranian Saga: a Pause or an Impasse?
    Alexei Arbatov December 22, 2014

    After another failed attempt to reach an agreement on the Iranian nuclear program, all now depends on whether Russia, the United States, and other states can find the political will to take responsibility for global security.

     
  • Strategic Europe
    Entering 2015, Europe Is Losing America
    Judy Dempsey December 19, 2014

    2014 was the year in which most European leaders treated the transatlantic relationship with benign neglect for which they will pay dearly.

     
  • Strategic Europe
    The Rotten and the Forgotten of 2014 World Politics
    Jan Techau December 16, 2014

    The last twelve months have been unusually eventful. Amid the vicissitudes of 2014, highlights include a resurgent Russia, shrewd Scots, and the EU’s underrated foreign policy.

     
  • Strategic Europe
    Europe, the CIA, and Torture
    Judy Dempsey December 15, 2014

    If European countries are to have any credibility in defending human rights, they should go public over their role in collaborating with the CIA on torture.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    Lessons from Vienna
    Nikolay Kozhanov December 12, 2014

    The experience gained in Vienna may be useful in future talks. In order to make the further negotiations effective, both Obama and Rouhani need to find a way to achieve a consensus of support for their actions within their own political establishments.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    Putin’s Urbi et Orbi
    Dmitri Trenin December 5, 2014

    Vladimir Putin’s annual address to parliament on December 4, 2014 has laid down the Kremlin's medium-term strategy. The next four or five years will be very difficult if not critical for Russia, and the Russians, in Putin’s view, absolutely must meet the challenges and win.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    Russian-American Confrontation in the Age of the Internet
    Pavel Sharikov November 28, 2014

    Recent events in Russian-American relations are often compared with events during the Cold War. There is no doubt that, along with other factors, information will play a key role in the new form of Russian-American confrontation.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    Putin’s Valdai Gambit
    Alexei Arbatov November 7, 2014

    Putin’s statements on weapons of mass destruction at the Valdai forum may have been just a tactical move to offset his harsh criticism of the United States. But it may well be an invitation to a serious discussion with Washington.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    The World’s Future: Bipolar Geoeconomics?
    Dmitri Trenin October 28, 2014

    Regionalization may indeed be the future or at least the new stage of globalization. Competition among the super-regions, in this scenario, will become the essence of global geoeconomics and geopolitics.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    European Perspectives of the “New Turkey”
    Pavel Shlykov December 24, 2014

    President Erdogan strives to find a sound strategy to minimize the current risks in foreign affairs. Despite resentment of the EU and the current stagnation of Turkey’s accession process, the EU retains its influence over Turkey because of the Turkish economy’s great dependence on the EU.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Why Is the United States Shortchanging Its Commitment to Democracy?
    Thomas Carothers December 23, 2014 Washington Post

    Supporting democracy, human rights, and better governance more effectively will not produce instant solutions to the current global crises. But such aid can be a crucial part of the necessary longer-term solutions.

     
  • Paper
    Russia’s Breakout From the Post–Cold War System: The Drivers of Putin’s Course
    Dmitri Trenin December 22, 2014

    In 2014, Russia broke out of the post–Cold War order and openly challenged the U.S.-led international system. Moscow’s new course is laid down first and foremost by President Vladimir Putin, but it also reflects the rising power of Russian nationalism.

     
  • Op-Ed
    The Sony Hack Is Not ‘Cybervandalism’
    David Rothkopf December 22, 2014 Foreign Policy

    Why the United States needs a broad, new strategy to prepare for—and defend against—the next generation of online warfare.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    The Iranian Saga: a Pause or an Impasse?
    Alexei Arbatov December 22, 2014

    After another failed attempt to reach an agreement on the Iranian nuclear program, all now depends on whether Russia, the United States, and other states can find the political will to take responsibility for global security.

     
  • Strategic Europe
    Entering 2015, Europe Is Losing America
    Judy Dempsey December 19, 2014

    2014 was the year in which most European leaders treated the transatlantic relationship with benign neglect for which they will pay dearly.

     
  • Op-Ed
    The Cuba Deal: Why Now?
    Moisés Naím December 18, 2014 Atlantic

    The decision to restore diplomatic ties between the United States and Cuba was driven by a surprising convergence of biology and technology.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Amano’s Move on Marivan
    Mark Hibbs December 18, 2014 Arms Control Wonk

    Questions raised by IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano about what he calls “possible military dimensions” of Iran’s nuclear program are standing tall between the negotiators and a comprehensive settlement of the crisis.

     
  • TV/Radio Broadcast
    End of the Cuba Embargo?
    Moisés Naím December 17, 2014 WNYC’s Brian Lehrer Show

    The United States and Cuba have agreed to a prisoner swap that could signal the end of the embargo that dates to the Cold War.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Soldiers for Ignorance
    David Rothkopf December 16, 2014 Foreign Policy

    While the attacks in Pakistan and Yemen may have been attempts to forestall the future, they are also foreshadowings of some of the likely big stories that may dominate the global scene in 2015.

     

Carnegie Experts on United States

  • Cornelius Adebahr
    Associate
    Europe Program

    Adebahr is an associate in the Europe Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace in Washington, DC. His research focuses on European foreign policy.

  •  
  • David Burwell
    Energy and Climate Program

    Burwell focuses on the intersection between energy, transportation, and climate issues, as well as policies and practice reforms to reduce global dependence on fossil fuels.

  •  
  • Chen Qi
    Resident Scholar
    Carnegie-Tsinghua Center for Global Policy

    Chen Qi is an expert on U.S.-China relations, global governance, and China’s foreign policy. Chen runs the Carnegie-Tsinghua Center for Global Policy’s U.S.-China Track II dialogue.

  •  
  • James Collins
    Senior Associate, Russia and Eurasia Program;
    Diplomat in Residence

    Ambassador Collins was the U.S. ambassador to the Russian Federation from 1997 to 2001 and is an expert on the former Soviet Union, its successor states, and the Middle East.

  •  
  • Toby Dalton
    Co-director
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Dalton is the co-director of the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment. An expert on nonproliferation and nuclear energy, his research focuses on cooperative nuclear security initiatives and the management of nuclear challenges in South Asia and East Asia.

  •  
  • Deborah Gordon
    Director
    Energy and Climate Program

    Gordon is director of Carnegie’s Energy and Climate Program, where her research focuses on oil and climate change issues in North America and globally.

  •  
  • Oz Hassan
    Visiting Scholar
    Democracy and Rule of Law Program

    Hassan is one of the United Kingdom’s foremost authorities on democracy promotion and democracy assistance programs and a leading scholar on U.S. foreign policy.

  •  
  • John Judis
    Visiting Scholar

    Judis is a senior editor of the New Republic, where he has worked since 1984. As a visiting scholar at Carnegie, Judis wrote The Folly of Empire: What George W. Bush Could Learn from Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson.

  •  
  • Duyeon Kim
    Associate
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Kim is an expert on nuclear nonproliferation, nuclear security, and Asia.

  •  
  • Jessica Tuchman Mathews
    President

    Mathews is president of the Carnegie Endowment. Before her appointment in 1997, her career included posts in both the executive and legislative branches of government, in management and research in the nonprofit arena, and in journalism and science policy.

  •  
  • Marwan Muasher
    Vice President for Studies

    Muasher is vice president for studies at Carnegie, where he oversees research in Washington and Beirut on the Middle East.

  •  
  • Moisés Naím
    Distinguished Fellow
    International Economics Program

    Naím is a distinguished fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, where his research focuses on international economics and global politics. He is currently the chief international columnist for El País, Spain’s largest newspaper, and his weekly column is published worldwide.

  •  
  • Carole Nakhle
    Nonresident Scholar
    Middle East Center

    Nakhle is a nonresident scholar at Carnegie Middle East Center, specializing in international petroleum contracts and fiscal regimes for the oil and gas industry, world oil and gas market developments, energy policy, and oil and gas revenue management.

  •  
  • Douglas H. Paal
    Vice President for Studies

    Paal previously served as vice chairman of JPMorgan Chase International and as unofficial U.S. representative to Taiwan as director of the American Institute in Taiwan.

  •  
  • George Perkovich
    Vice President for Studies

    Perkovich’s research focuses on nuclear strategy and nonproliferation, with a concentration on South Asia, Iran, and the problem of justice in the international political economy.

  •  
  • David Rothkopf
    Visiting Scholar

    Rothkopf, author of the recent book Power, Inc.: The Epic Rivalry Between Big Business and Government and the Reckoning that Lies Ahead, served as deputy undersecretary of commerce for international trade policy in the Clinton administration.

  •  
  • Paul Schulte
    Nonresident Senior Associate
    Nuclear Policy Program and Carnegie Europe

    Schulte is a nonresident senior associate in the Carnegie Nuclear Policy Program and at Carnegie Europe, where his research focuses on the future of deterrence, nuclear strategy, nuclear nonproliferation, cybersecurity, and their political implications.

  •  
  • Jan Techau
    Director
    Carnegie Europe

    Techau is the director of Carnegie Europe, the European center of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. Techau works on EU integration and foreign policy, transatlantic affairs, and German foreign and security policy.

  •  
  • Tong Zhao
    Associate
    Carnegie-Tsinghua Center for Global Policy

    Tong Zhao is an associate in Carnegie’s Nuclear Policy Program based at the Carnegie–Tsinghua Center for Global Policy.

  •  

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