South Asia

 
  • Op-Ed
    A Modi Doctrine?
    Christophe Jaffrelot November 20, 2014 Indian Express

    Modi’s foreign policy seems to highlight two priorities: India’s economic interests and its immediate neighborhood.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Nehru at 125: The Great Game Folio
    C. Raja Mohan November 14, 2014 Indian Express

    Arguments in New Delhi about Jawaharlal Nehru probably say more about India’s contemporary politics than the achievements and failures of its first prime minister.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Modi in Myanmar: Rebuilding the Historic Connections
    C. Raja Mohan November 12, 2014 Indian Express

    Modi has his work cut out for him in bridging the growing gap between the potential and reality of India’s partnership with Myanmar.

     
  • Op-Ed
    PM Narendra Modi in Myanmar: Rebuilding the Historic Connections
    C. Raja Mohan November 12, 2014 Indian Express

    Prime Minister Modi has his task cut out in bridging the growing gap between the potential and reality of India’s partnership with Myanmar.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Summitry and Substance
    C. Raja Mohan November 11, 2014 Indian Express

    Modi should trust his own instincts rather than conform to the prevailing canon in the political class and the bureaucratic establishment on the issues to be discussed at the East Asian Summit and the G-20 meeting.

     
  • Op-Ed
    New Leadership Unlikely to Shift Priorities for Pakistan’s ISI
    Frederic Grare November 11, 2014 World Politics Review

    The new head of Pakistan’s Inter-Services Intelligence, Lt. Gen. Rizwan Akhtar, is unlikely to make big changes in the organization’s strategic orientation or operations.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Securing Kabul
    Christophe Jaffrelot November 10, 2014 Indian Express

    It remains to be seen if the Afghan National Army will be able to resist the Taliban, which has already rejected President Ghani’s invitation for peace talks.

     
  • Op-Ed
    India and the Middle East: Finding a New Balance
    C. Raja Mohan November 9, 2014 Indian Express

    While some might find India’s new approach to the Middle East somewhat disconcerting, the government of Narendra Modi is bringing pragmatism and transparency to India’s Middle East policy.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Imagining Greater India
    C. Raja Mohan November 6, 2014 Indian Express

    Modi has a rare opportunity to tap into positive trends within the South Asian diaspora. An intensive engagement with the South Asian diaspora would be a valuable complement to Modi’s declared strategy of befriending neighbors.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Chinese Takeaway: Lanka Pit-Stop
    C. Raja Mohan November 5, 2014 Indian Express

    Statements from Colombo and Beijing on the frequent appearance of Chinese submarines and ships at Sri Lankan ports are likely to worsen New Delhi’s concerns rather than blunt them.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    Pakistan’s Minorities Under the Shadow of Fear
    Petr Topychkanov November 13, 2014

    Pakistani religious minorities live in fear. This fear can only abate through the Pakistani government’s consistent and tough policies directed at the softening of the blasphemy law and cracking down on any attempts of vigilante justice.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    Is Russia Afraid of Chinese and Indian Missiles?
    Petr Topychkanov November 3, 2014

    China and India would definitely want to know if Russia is really so afraid of the missiles they are developing that is ready to abandon the INF Treaty.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    Moscow’s Silence on the Kashmir Problem
    Petr Topychkanov October 31, 2014

    Russia certainly seeks to further its strategic partnership with India and to continue to develop its relations with Pakistan. However, its moves will face growing mistrust in New Delhi and Islamabad if Moscow remains silent on South Asia’s hot-button issues.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    Eurasia and the ASEM Summit
    Richard Youngs October 23, 2014

    It would be a stretch to think that ASEM can foster any kind of benign diplomatic triangle between the EU, Russia, and Asian powers. However, ASEM may survive as an interesting mix of debating club, retreat and venue for bilateral meetings.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    The West Should Not Reject Russia’s Assistance in Afghanistan
    Petr Topychkanov October 14, 2014

    If common sense prevails and the West resumes its cooperation with Russia, the consolidated response to security threats in Afghanistan will be far more effective than the current disjointed efforts by various countries.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    The Problem of ISIS as the Prism of Contemporary Politics
    Alexei Arbatov October 3, 2014

    The events in the Middle East in the last few months have muddled the primitive black-and-white picture painted by the advocates for the new Cold War. The modern world presents us with an incredibly complex, conflicting and at times somewhat bizarre picture.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    Will Delhi and Washington Be Able to Transform Defense Cooperation?
    Petr Topychkanov October 2, 2014

    Indian and U.S. leaders recently discussed military-technological cooperation. Time will tell whether the countries will be ready to transform their cooperation by translating words into actions.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    Pakistan’s Autumn Fever
    Petr Topychkanov September 26, 2014

    Pakistan has been in turmoil for more than 40 days: protests headed by Imran Khan and Tahir-ul-Qadri have taken the country by storm. Yet the protest movement seems to be running out of steam. The weakening of the protest movement has much to do with Prime Minister Sharif’s decision not to crack down on the protests.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    Russia and the New South East Asia
    Akio Kawato September 9, 2014

    East Asia is coming back to a phase in which economic considerations dominate. In this milieu Russia may lose her place in East Asia, because it will be deprived of an opportunity to play China against the West.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    From Fergana Valley to Syria—the Transformation of Central Asian Radical Islam
    Bayram Balci July 25, 2014

    The radical jihadi group known as the Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan (IMU) emerged after the collapse of the Soviet Union. A little bit more than twenty years after it first appeared, this on-going transformation has made it less connected to Uzbekistan, and more to a global jihad.

     
  • Event
    Prospects for the Coalition Government in Afghanistan
    William Maley, Frederic Grare November 13, 2014 Washington, DC

    While Afghanistan may be emerging from the period of great uncertainty that followed the fraud-ridden presidential run-off of June 2014, it is far from out of the woods.

     
  • Event
    Pakistan’s Role in Afghanistan’s Transition
    Frederic Grare, Samina Ahmed, Mark Schneider November 6, 2014 Washington, DC

    As the deadline for withdrawal of U.S. troops in Afghanistan approaches, Afghanistan’s neighbors will have a greater impact on shaping the country’s uncertain future.

     
  • Event
    National Insecurity
    David Rothkopf, Joshua Bolten, Zbigniew Brzezinski, Brent Scowcroft October 30, 2014 Washington, DC

    From the Middle East to Eastern Europe, crises grip the globe. A growing group of rivals and dangerous non-state actors now pose an array of new threats to the international order.

     
  • Event
    Corruption, Crime, and Terrorism
    Moisés Naím, Milan Vaishnav, Louise Shelley October 22, 2014 Washington, DC

    The entangled threat of crime, corruption, and terrorism remain important security challenges in the twenty-first century.

     
  • Event
    Modi’s Transformative Moment?
    Christophe Jaffrelot, Milan Vaishnav October 17, 2014 Washington, DC

    The first 100 days of a new government can be tumultuous as power shifts hands and leaders make dramatic decisions. But Prime Minister Narendra Modi has thus far proceeded in a more nuanced fashion, making an assessment of his first four months in office more complicated.

     
  • Event
    Exploring the Prospects for Russian-Turkish Cooperation
    Dmitri Trenin, Memduh Karakullukçu, Nigar Ağaoğulları, Ümit Pamir, Alexey Malashenko, Evgeny Buzhinsky, Irina Zvyagelskaya, Pavel Shlykov October 16, 2014 Moscow

    Russia and Turkey share many important interests, providing them with opportunities for valuable collaboration and cooperation in their common neighborhood, which stretches from the South Caucasus and the Levant to Central Asia and Afghanistan.

     
  • Event
    The End of Convergence?
    Uri Dadush, Vikram Nehru, Carl Dahlman October 15, 2014 Washington, DC

    Convergence, the narrowing of the income gap between poor and rich countries, is one of the great stories of our time. A recent report shows that convergence has slowed in recent years, and that productivity in developing countries is not rising rapidly enough in key sectors.

     
  • Event
    Asian Poverty: The Untold Story
    Shang-Jin Wei, Vikram Nehru October 9, 2014 Washington, DC

    According to the World Bank’s standard poverty measure, one in five Asians live in extreme poverty. However, a recent Asian Development Bank (ADB) report, asserts that this standard measure does not capture the true extent of extreme poverty in the region.

     
  • Event
    India First: Modi’s Approach to Foreign Policy
    Frederic Grare, Samir Saran September 24, 2014 Washington, DC

    While Prime Minister Modi has been able to instil a certain energy and purpose in Delhi, some key domestic imperatives and his own personal preferences are beginning to define India’s global play.

     
  • Event
    Senator John McCain on Strengthening U.S.-India Relations
    Ashley J. Tellis, John McCain September 9, 2014 Washington, DC

    Senator John McCain recently visited India and was the first high-level U.S. government official to meet with Prime Minister Modi.

     

Getting India Back on Track: An Action Agenda for Reform

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India Decides 2014

Carnegie Experts on South Asia

  • Muthiah Alagappa
    Nonresident Senior Associate
    Asia Program

    Alagappa, a nonresident senior associate in the Asia Program, was the first holder of the Tun Hussein Onn Chair in international studies at the Institute of Strategic and International Studies in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. His research focuses primarily on Asian security, the political legitimacy of governments, civil society and political change, and the political role of the military in Asia.

  •  
  • Neha Ansari
    Visiting Researcher
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Neha Ansari is a visiting researcher in Carnegie’s Nuclear Policy Program. Her research focuses on South Asia, particularly strategic relations between Afghanistan, Pakistan, and India.

  •  
  • Sarah Chayes
    Senior Associate
    Democracy and Rule of Law Program
    South Asia Program

    Chayes, formerly special adviser to the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, is an expert in South Asia policy, kleptocracy and anticorruption, and civil-military relations.

  •  
  • Toby Dalton
    Co-director
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Dalton is the co-director of the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment. An expert on nonproliferation and nuclear energy, his research focuses on cooperative nuclear security initiatives and the management of nuclear challenges in South Asia and East Asia.

  •  
  • Gilles Dorronsoro
    Nonresident Scholar
    South Asia Program

    Dorronsoro’s research focuses on security and political development in Afghanistan. He was a professor of political science at the Sorbonne in Paris and the Institute of Political Studies of Rennes.

  •  
  • Evan A. Feigenbaum
    Nonresident Senior Associate
    Asia Program

    Feigenbaum’s work focuses principally on China and India, geopolitics in Asia, and the role of the United States in East, Central, and South Asia. His previous positions include deputy assistant secretary of state for South Asia, deputy assistant secretary of state for Central Asia, and member of the secretary of state’s policy planning staff with principal responsibility for East Asia and the Pacific.

  •  
  • Frederic Grare
    Director and Senior Associate
    South Asia Program

    Grare is senior associate and director of Carnegie’s South Asia Program. His research focuses on security issues and democratization in India, Afghanistan, and Pakistan. Previously, he led the Asia bureau at the Directorate for Strategic Affairs in the French Ministry of Defense.

  •  
  • Oz Hassan
    Visiting Scholar
    Democracy and Rule of Law Program

    Hassan is one of the United Kingdom’s foremost authorities on democracy promotion and democracy assistance programs and a leading scholar on U.S. foreign policy.

  •  
  • Christophe Jaffrelot
    Nonresident Scholar
    South Asia Program

    Jaffrelot’s core research focuses on theories of nationalism and democracy, mobilization of the lower castes and Dalits (ex-untouchables) in India, the Hindu nationalist movement, and ethnic conflicts in Pakistan.

  •  
  • Jessica Tuchman Mathews
    President

    Mathews is president of the Carnegie Endowment. Before her appointment in 1997, her career included posts in both the executive and legislative branches of government, in management and research in the nonprofit arena, and in journalism and science policy.

  •  
  • C. Raja Mohan
    Nonresident Senior Associate
    South Asia Program

    Mohan is a nonresident senior associate in Carnegie’s South Asia Program, where his research focuses on international security, defense, and Asian strategic issues.

  •  
  • Nathaniel Myers
    Visiting Scholar

    Nathaniel Myers is a visiting scholar in Carnegie’s Democracy and Rule of Law program. His research focuses on the intersection of American foreign assistance and foreign policy.

  •  
  • Vikram Nehru
    Senior Associate
    Asia Program
    Bakrie Chair in Southeast Asian Studies

    Nehru is a senior associate in the Carnegie Asia Program. An expert on development economics, growth, poverty reduction, debt sustainability, governance, and the performance and prospects of East Asia, his research focuses on the economic, political, and strategic issues confronting Asia, particularly Southeast Asia.

  •  
  • George Perkovich
    Vice President for Studies

    Perkovich’s research focuses on nuclear strategy and nonproliferation, with a concentration on South Asia, Iran, and the problem of justice in the international political economy.

  •  
  • David Rothkopf
    Visiting Scholar

    Rothkopf, author of the recent book Power, Inc.: The Epic Rivalry Between Big Business and Government and the Reckoning that Lies Ahead, served as deputy undersecretary of commerce for international trade policy in the Clinton administration.

  •  
  • Tamanna Salikuddin
    Nonresident Scholar
    South Asia Program

    Salikuddin was director for Afghanistan and Pakistan at the U.S. National Security Council from 2011 to 2013.

  •  
  • Paul Schulte
    Nonresident Senior Associate
    Nuclear Policy Program and Carnegie Europe

    Schulte is a nonresident senior associate in the Carnegie Nuclear Policy Program and at Carnegie Europe, where his research focuses on the future of deterrence, nuclear strategy, nuclear nonproliferation, cybersecurity, and their political implications.

  •  
  • Stephen Tankel
    Nonresident Scholar
    South Asia Program

    Tankel is a nonresident scholar at the Carnegie Endowment, where his research focuses on insurgency, terrorism, and the evolution of nonstate armed groups.

  •  
  • Ashley J. Tellis
    Senior Associate
    South Asia Program

    Tellis is a senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace specializing in international security, defense, and Asian strategic issues.

  •  
  • Petr Topychkanov
    Associate
    Nonproliferation Program
    Moscow Center

    Topychkanov is an associate in the Carnegie Moscow Center’s Nonproliferation Program.

  •  
  • Milan Vaishnav
    Associate
    South Asia Program

    Vaishnav’s primary research focus is the political economy of India, and he examines issues such as corruption, ethnic politics, governance and state capacity, election finance, and distributive politics.

  •  
  • Bernd von Muenchow-Pohl
    Nonresident Scholar
    South Asia Program

    Von Muenchow-Pohl is a nonresident scholar in Carnegie’s South Asia Program, where his work focuses on Indian domestic, foreign, and economic policy.

  •  

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