South Asia

 
  • Op-Ed
    Chinese Takeaway: Beijing’s Afghan Role
    C. Raja Mohan December 17, 2014 Indian Express

    As the American occupation of Afghanistan comes to an end, China is getting ready to play a significant role in a country that has seen many great powers bite the dust.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Soldiers for Ignorance
    David Rothkopf December 16, 2014 Foreign Policy

    While the attacks in Pakistan and Yemen may have been attempts to forestall the future, they are also foreshadowings of some of the likely big stories that may dominate the global scene in 2015.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Modi’s Diplomacy: Yoga, Democracy, and India’s Soft Power
    C. Raja Mohan December 15, 2014 Indian Express

    The United Nations General Assembly recently declared an annual International Day of Yoga. This small step underlines the immense possibilities for projecting India’s soft power under Modi.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Afghanistan: The Great Game Folio
    C. Raja Mohan December 12, 2014 Indian Express

    Partition has given Pakistan the power to disrupt Afghanistan, but not enough to construct a stable order. This tragic story of the Great Game is unlikely to change in 2015.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Being Middle Class in India
    Milan Vaishnav, Devesh Kapur December 9, 2014 Hindu

    Are differences within India’s middle class, in income, education, and cultural and social capital, so wide as to render moot any ideological or behavioral coherence to this group?

     
  • Op-Ed
    Russia Must Sit Up and Take Notice of India
    Dmitri Trenin December 9, 2014 The Moscow Times

    It appears that Vladimir Putin’s visit to India will not lead to a breakthrough in Russian-Indian relations. If nothing is done soon following his visit to materially upgrade the relationship, its stagnation will become qualitative, not just quantitative.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Chinese Takeaway: Modi’s Buddhism
    C. Raja Mohan December 3, 2014 Indian Express

    In his outreach to leaders in the subcontinent and Asia, from Nepal to Japan and China to Myanmar, Modi has projected Buddhism as one of India’s bridges to these nations.

     
  • Other Publications
    Seeking Alliances and Partnerships: The Long Road to Confederationism in U.S. Grand Strategy
    Ashley J. Tellis December 2, 2014 National Bureau of Asian Research

    The United States has consistently rejected both isolationism and multilateralism as instruments for meeting its highest strategic ambitions, instead utilizing a dialectical relationship between confederationism and unilateralism to achieve hegemony.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Parivar’s Diversity in Unity
    Christophe Jaffrelot December 1, 2014 Indian Express

    Every sector of society is now represented in the Sangh Parivar, and their perspectives may not necessarily converge with the government’s policies.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Dhaka Boundary Settlement: Narendra Modi Bites the Bullet
    C. Raja Mohan December 1, 2014 Indian Express

    Constructing a border of cooperation with Bangladesh should liberate India from one of the major geopolitical constraints imposed on it by the Partition of Bengal.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    Russia’s Pivot to Asia: Is It Good for Russia and Is It Successful?
    Akio Kawato, Arkady Dubnov, Alexander Gabuev, Petr Topychkanov, Pavel Shlykov December 16, 2014

    Many are talking about Russia’s pivot eastward, but is it working? Eurasia Outlook posed the question to some leading experts in the field in order to gather some thoughts about the policy’s effectiveness.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    What Do You Expect from Vladimir Putin’s Visit to India?
    Vinay Shukla, Tatiana Shaumyan, Arun Mohanty, Petr Topychkanov December 9, 2014

    What do you expect from Vladimir Putin’s visit to India? Eurasia Outlook posed the question to some leading experts in the field in order to gather some predictions about the meeting’s significance to Russia-India relations moving forward.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    Strategic Partnership Without Strategy?
    Petr Topychkanov December 8, 2014

    Russia and India should initiate the creation of a roadmap for developing Russian-Indian relations. Without a binding roadmap, the “strategic partnership” will remain nothing but pretty window dressing that conceals the absence of strategy.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    Will Mi-35M Helicopters Fly to Pakistan?
    Petr Topychkanov November 26, 2014

    Military cooperation between Russia and Pakistan will be very specific and driven by concrete, pragmatic, and limited goals. At the same time, India remains Russia’s priority partner.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    Pakistan’s Minorities Under the Shadow of Fear
    Petr Topychkanov November 13, 2014

    Pakistani religious minorities live in fear. This fear can only abate through the Pakistani government’s consistent and tough policies directed at the softening of the blasphemy law and cracking down on any attempts of vigilante justice.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    Is Russia Afraid of Chinese and Indian Missiles?
    Petr Topychkanov November 3, 2014

    China and India would definitely want to know if Russia is really so afraid of the missiles they are developing that is ready to abandon the INF Treaty.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    Moscow’s Silence on the Kashmir Problem
    Petr Topychkanov October 31, 2014

    Russia certainly seeks to further its strategic partnership with India and to continue to develop its relations with Pakistan. However, its moves will face growing mistrust in New Delhi and Islamabad if Moscow remains silent on South Asia’s hot-button issues.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    Eurasia and the ASEM Summit
    Richard Youngs October 23, 2014

    It would be a stretch to think that ASEM can foster any kind of benign diplomatic triangle between the EU, Russia, and Asian powers. However, ASEM may survive as an interesting mix of debating club, retreat and venue for bilateral meetings.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    The West Should Not Reject Russia’s Assistance in Afghanistan
    Petr Topychkanov October 14, 2014

    If common sense prevails and the West resumes its cooperation with Russia, the consolidated response to security threats in Afghanistan will be far more effective than the current disjointed efforts by various countries.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    The Problem of ISIS as the Prism of Contemporary Politics
    Alexei Arbatov October 3, 2014

    The events in the Middle East in the last few months have muddled the primitive black-and-white picture painted by the advocates for the new Cold War. The modern world presents us with an incredibly complex, conflicting and at times somewhat bizarre picture.

     
  • Event
    Aid in Afghanistan After 2014
    Sarah Chayes, John Sopko December 10, 2014 Washington, DC

    As U.S. and coalition forces in Afghanistan withdraw to their post-2014 minimums, many fear a similar sharp drop in foreign funding. The reconstruction effort is far from over, and a radical reduction in foreign aid could cripple the Afghan economy.

     
  • Event
    Jihadist Movements in Afghanistan, Syria, and Iraq: Inevitable Rise or Policy Failure?
    Adam Baczko, Gilles Dorronsoro, Frederic Grare, Arthur Quesnay, Frederic Wehrey November 24, 2014 Washington, DC

    How has U.S. policy failed to anticipate current developments of jihadist movements from Afghanistan to Syria?

     
  • Event
    Prospects for the Coalition Government in Afghanistan
    William Maley, Frederic Grare November 13, 2014 Washington, DC

    While Afghanistan may be emerging from the period of great uncertainty that followed the fraud-ridden presidential run-off of June 2014, it is far from out of the woods.

     
  • Event
    Pakistan’s Role in Afghanistan’s Transition
    Frederic Grare, Samina Ahmed, Mark Schneider November 6, 2014 Washington, DC

    As the deadline for withdrawal of U.S. troops in Afghanistan approaches, Afghanistan’s neighbors will have a greater impact on shaping the country’s uncertain future.

     
  • Event
    National Insecurity
    David Rothkopf, Joshua Bolten, Zbigniew Brzezinski, Brent Scowcroft October 30, 2014 Washington, DC

    From the Middle East to Eastern Europe, crises grip the globe. A growing group of rivals and dangerous non-state actors now pose an array of new threats to the international order.

     
  • Event
    Corruption, Crime, and Terrorism
    Moisés Naím, Milan Vaishnav, Louise Shelley October 22, 2014 Washington, DC

    The entangled threat of crime, corruption, and terrorism remain important security challenges in the twenty-first century.

     
  • Event
    Modi’s Transformative Moment?
    Christophe Jaffrelot, Milan Vaishnav October 17, 2014 Washington, DC

    The first 100 days of a new government can be tumultuous as power shifts hands and leaders make dramatic decisions. But Prime Minister Narendra Modi has thus far proceeded in a more nuanced fashion, making an assessment of his first four months in office more complicated.

     
  • Event
    Exploring the Prospects for Russian-Turkish Cooperation
    Dmitri Trenin, Memduh Karakullukçu, Nigar Ağaoğulları, Ümit Pamir, Alexey Malashenko, Evgeny Buzhinsky, Irina Zvyagelskaya, Pavel Shlykov October 16, 2014 Moscow

    Russia and Turkey share many important interests, providing them with opportunities for valuable collaboration and cooperation in their common neighborhood, which stretches from the South Caucasus and the Levant to Central Asia and Afghanistan.

     
  • Event
    The End of Convergence?
    Uri Dadush, Vikram Nehru, Carl Dahlman October 15, 2014 Washington, DC

    Convergence, the narrowing of the income gap between poor and rich countries, is one of the great stories of our time. A recent report shows that convergence has slowed in recent years, and that productivity in developing countries is not rising rapidly enough in key sectors.

     
  • Event
    Asian Poverty: The Untold Story
    Shang-Jin Wei, Vikram Nehru October 9, 2014 Washington, DC

    According to the World Bank’s standard poverty measure, one in five Asians live in extreme poverty. However, a recent Asian Development Bank (ADB) report, asserts that this standard measure does not capture the true extent of extreme poverty in the region.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Chinese Takeaway: Beijing’s Afghan Role
    C. Raja Mohan December 17, 2014 Indian Express

    As the American occupation of Afghanistan comes to an end, China is getting ready to play a significant role in a country that has seen many great powers bite the dust.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Soldiers for Ignorance
    David Rothkopf December 16, 2014 Foreign Policy

    While the attacks in Pakistan and Yemen may have been attempts to forestall the future, they are also foreshadowings of some of the likely big stories that may dominate the global scene in 2015.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    Russia’s Pivot to Asia: Is It Good for Russia and Is It Successful?
    Akio Kawato, Arkady Dubnov, Alexander Gabuev, Petr Topychkanov, Pavel Shlykov December 16, 2014

    Many are talking about Russia’s pivot eastward, but is it working? Eurasia Outlook posed the question to some leading experts in the field in order to gather some thoughts about the policy’s effectiveness.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Modi’s Diplomacy: Yoga, Democracy, and India’s Soft Power
    C. Raja Mohan December 15, 2014 Indian Express

    The United Nations General Assembly recently declared an annual International Day of Yoga. This small step underlines the immense possibilities for projecting India’s soft power under Modi.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Afghanistan: The Great Game Folio
    C. Raja Mohan December 12, 2014 Indian Express

    Partition has given Pakistan the power to disrupt Afghanistan, but not enough to construct a stable order. This tragic story of the Great Game is unlikely to change in 2015.

     
  • Event
    Aid in Afghanistan After 2014
    Sarah Chayes, John Sopko December 10, 2014 Washington, DC

    As U.S. and coalition forces in Afghanistan withdraw to their post-2014 minimums, many fear a similar sharp drop in foreign funding. The reconstruction effort is far from over, and a radical reduction in foreign aid could cripple the Afghan economy.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Being Middle Class in India
    Milan Vaishnav, Devesh Kapur December 9, 2014 Hindu

    Are differences within India’s middle class, in income, education, and cultural and social capital, so wide as to render moot any ideological or behavioral coherence to this group?

     
  • Op-Ed
    Russia Must Sit Up and Take Notice of India
    Dmitri Trenin December 9, 2014 The Moscow Times

    It appears that Vladimir Putin’s visit to India will not lead to a breakthrough in Russian-Indian relations. If nothing is done soon following his visit to materially upgrade the relationship, its stagnation will become qualitative, not just quantitative.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    What Do You Expect from Vladimir Putin’s Visit to India?
    Vinay Shukla, Tatiana Shaumyan, Arun Mohanty, Petr Topychkanov December 9, 2014

    What do you expect from Vladimir Putin’s visit to India? Eurasia Outlook posed the question to some leading experts in the field in order to gather some predictions about the meeting’s significance to Russia-India relations moving forward.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    Strategic Partnership Without Strategy?
    Petr Topychkanov December 8, 2014

    Russia and India should initiate the creation of a roadmap for developing Russian-Indian relations. Without a binding roadmap, the “strategic partnership” will remain nothing but pretty window dressing that conceals the absence of strategy.

     

Getting India Back on Track: An Action Agenda for Reform

Carnegie Video

00:00 | 00:00
0
0:00 | 0:00
 

India Decides 2014

Carnegie Experts on South Asia

  • Muthiah Alagappa
    Nonresident Senior Associate
    Asia Program

    Alagappa, a nonresident senior associate in the Asia Program, was the first holder of the Tun Hussein Onn Chair in international studies at the Institute of Strategic and International Studies in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. His research focuses primarily on Asian security, the political legitimacy of governments, civil society and political change, and the political role of the military in Asia.

  •  
  • Neha Ansari
    Visiting Researcher
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Neha Ansari is a visiting researcher in Carnegie’s Nuclear Policy Program. Her research focuses on South Asia, particularly strategic relations between Afghanistan, Pakistan, and India.

  •  
  • Sarah Chayes
    Senior Associate
    Democracy and Rule of Law Program
    South Asia Program

    Chayes, formerly special adviser to the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, is an expert in South Asia policy, kleptocracy and anticorruption, and civil-military relations.

  •  
  • Toby Dalton
    Co-director
    Nuclear Policy Program

    Dalton is the co-director of the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment. An expert on nonproliferation and nuclear energy, his research focuses on cooperative nuclear security initiatives and the management of nuclear challenges in South Asia and East Asia.

  •  
  • Gilles Dorronsoro
    Nonresident Scholar
    South Asia Program

    Dorronsoro’s research focuses on security and political development in Afghanistan. He was a professor of political science at the Sorbonne in Paris and the Institute of Political Studies of Rennes.

  •  
  • Evan A. Feigenbaum
    Nonresident Senior Associate
    Asia Program

    Feigenbaum’s work focuses principally on China and India, geopolitics in Asia, and the role of the United States in East, Central, and South Asia. His previous positions include deputy assistant secretary of state for South Asia, deputy assistant secretary of state for Central Asia, and member of the secretary of state’s policy planning staff with principal responsibility for East Asia and the Pacific.

  •  
  • Frederic Grare
    Director and Senior Associate
    South Asia Program

    Grare is senior associate and director of Carnegie’s South Asia Program. His research focuses on security issues and democratization in India, Afghanistan, and Pakistan. Previously, he led the Asia bureau at the Directorate for Strategic Affairs in the French Ministry of Defense.

  •  
  • Oz Hassan
    Visiting Scholar
    Democracy and Rule of Law Program

    Hassan is one of the United Kingdom’s foremost authorities on democracy promotion and democracy assistance programs and a leading scholar on U.S. foreign policy.

  •  
  • Christophe Jaffrelot
    Nonresident Scholar
    South Asia Program

    Jaffrelot’s core research focuses on theories of nationalism and democracy, mobilization of the lower castes and Dalits (ex-untouchables) in India, the Hindu nationalist movement, and ethnic conflicts in Pakistan.

  •  
  • Jessica Tuchman Mathews
    President

    Mathews is president of the Carnegie Endowment. Before her appointment in 1997, her career included posts in both the executive and legislative branches of government, in management and research in the nonprofit arena, and in journalism and science policy.

  •  
  • C. Raja Mohan
    Nonresident Senior Associate
    South Asia Program

    Mohan is a nonresident senior associate in Carnegie’s South Asia Program, where his research focuses on international security, defense, and Asian strategic issues.

  •  
  • Nathaniel Myers
    Visiting Scholar

    Nathaniel Myers is a visiting scholar in Carnegie’s Democracy and Rule of Law program. His research focuses on the intersection of American foreign assistance and foreign policy.

  •  
  • Carole Nakhle
    Nonresident Scholar
    Middle East Center

    Nakhle is a nonresident scholar at Carnegie Middle East Center, specializing in international petroleum contracts and fiscal regimes for the oil and gas industry, world oil and gas market developments, energy policy, and oil and gas revenue management.

  •  
  • Vikram Nehru
    Senior Associate
    Asia Program
    Bakrie Chair in Southeast Asian Studies

    Nehru is a senior associate in the Carnegie Asia Program. An expert on development economics, growth, poverty reduction, debt sustainability, governance, and the performance and prospects of East Asia, his research focuses on the economic, political, and strategic issues confronting Asia, particularly Southeast Asia.

  •  
  • George Perkovich
    Vice President for Studies

    Perkovich’s research focuses on nuclear strategy and nonproliferation, with a concentration on South Asia, Iran, and the problem of justice in the international political economy.

  •  
  • David Rothkopf
    Visiting Scholar

    Rothkopf, author of the recent book Power, Inc.: The Epic Rivalry Between Big Business and Government and the Reckoning that Lies Ahead, served as deputy undersecretary of commerce for international trade policy in the Clinton administration.

  •  
  • Tamanna Salikuddin
    Nonresident Scholar
    South Asia Program

    Salikuddin was director for Afghanistan and Pakistan at the U.S. National Security Council from 2011 to 2013.

  •  
  • Paul Schulte
    Nonresident Senior Associate
    Nuclear Policy Program and Carnegie Europe

    Schulte is a nonresident senior associate in the Carnegie Nuclear Policy Program and at Carnegie Europe, where his research focuses on the future of deterrence, nuclear strategy, nuclear nonproliferation, cybersecurity, and their political implications.

  •  
  • Stephen Tankel
    Nonresident Scholar
    South Asia Program

    Tankel is a nonresident scholar at the Carnegie Endowment, where his research focuses on insurgency, terrorism, and the evolution of nonstate armed groups.

  •  
  • Ashley J. Tellis
    Senior Associate
    South Asia Program

    Tellis is a senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace specializing in international security, defense, and Asian strategic issues.

  •  
  • Petr Topychkanov
    Associate
    Nonproliferation Program
    Moscow Center

    Topychkanov is an associate in the Carnegie Moscow Center’s Nonproliferation Program.

  •  
  • Milan Vaishnav
    Associate
    South Asia Program

    Vaishnav’s primary research focus is the political economy of India, and he examines issues such as corruption, ethnic politics, governance and state capacity, election finance, and distributive politics.

  •  
  • Bernd von Muenchow-Pohl
    Nonresident Scholar
    South Asia Program

    Von Muenchow-Pohl is a nonresident scholar in Carnegie’s South Asia Program, where his work focuses on Indian domestic, foreign, and economic policy.

  •  

Stay in the Know

Enter your email address to receive the latest Carnegie analysis in your inbox!

Personal Information
 
 
Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
 
1779 Massachusetts Avenue NW Washington, DC 20036-2103 Phone: 202 483 7600 Fax: 202 483 1840
Please note...

You are leaving the website for the Carnegie-Tsinghua Center for Global Policy and entering a website for another of Carnegie's global centers.

请注意...

你将离开清华—卡内基中心网站,进入卡内基其他全球中心的网站。