Narrow by
Use this menu to filter your search results. Check boxes below to return search results related to any combination of issue and regional interest.
Issues
Regions
Stay Connected to Sada Subscribe Sada is published in English and Arabic and available as articles are published or in a weekly digest.
Enter name and address (All fields are required)
Select Delivery
x
Egypt
 Print
 

Sada Debates

What Will Become of Egypt?

عربي

Following mass protests, Egypt’s military intervened on July 3 to remove President Mohamed Morsi from office, marking a dramatic turn in the country’s post-Mubarak transition. Four Egypt experts and Sada contributors weigh in on Egypt’s current predicament.

Following mass protests, Egypt’s military intervened on July 3 to remove President Mohamed Morsi from office, marking a dramatic turn in the country’s post-Mubarak transition. Egypt’s armed forces are now back at the helm, with promises of a new political roadmap and quick transition back to a civilian government. But the country is deeply divided and the path forward is profoundly uncertain.

Four Egypt experts and Sada contributors weigh in on Egypt’s current predicament. Each offers a unique perspective on different factions’ motivations for political reconciliation and compromise and whether a political solution is possible.

Please join the discussion by sharing your own views in the comments section.

Discussion

 
عربي

Comments (4)

 
 
  • abhishek sharma
    1 Recommend
     
    As it happens in all the failed revolutions, the extremists deserve to rule when anarchy becomes a law. Salafists are going to rule Egypt sooner or later.
     
     
    Reply to this post

     
    Close Panel
  • Jean Yves
    I think war can be avoided. It's just a matter of giving importance to the country and it's development. Unfortunately, the brotherhood mouvement has it's interest which are mainly about the control of the country and the whole sub region i also think that the fact that arms were founded in the G. Q. is a big problem and we wii br rights to think about the vocation of the mvt. Do the movement intend to create a state in a state?. This crise also impose reflexions about the concept of People, i think the A.U. PSC saw yhe importance of the question.
     
     
    Reply to this post

     
    Close Panel
  • Mona Sedky
    1 Recommend
     
    It's all about defining Egypt's identity. MB tried to reshape the country in its own image, and that has been rejected loud and clear on June 30th, when millions of Egyptians of all walks of life took to the streets, demanding the end of MB's rule.
     
     
    Reply to this post

     
    Close Panel
  • Monte Palmer
    1 Recommend
     
    Two Arabic articles may be of interest to readers. The first, written by General Al'lam, is entitle "Egypt is on the doorstep to civil war followed by the revolution of the hungry. (Elgornal,31 March.) The second is authored by Minister of Defense Al-Sisi and is entitled "If the army descends to the streets, Egypt will not progress for forty years. ((Elgornal 11 May.) Sisi also warned "This military is fire. Don't play with it." An English discussion of the two articles can be found in M.Palmer "Is Egypt on verge of civil war." Asia Times on Line, June 25 or Arab Psyche. wordpress.com.
     
     
    Reply to this post

     
    Close Panel
Source: http://carnegieendowment.org/2013/07/15/what-will-become-of-egypt/gfji

Twitter

Trending Topics

 

Stay Connected

Subscribe to Sada:
 
Subscription Options Sada is published in English and Arabic and available as articles are published or in a weekly digest.
Select Delivery
 
Carnegie Endowment for International Peace 1779 Massachusetts Ave. NW Washington, DC 20036-2103 P: 202.483.7600 F: 202.483.1840
Carnegie Middle East Center Emir Bechir Street, Lazarieh Tower Bldg. No. 2026 1210, 5th flr. Downtown Beirut P.O.Box 11-1061 Riad El Solh Lebanon P: +961 1 99 12 91 F: +961 1 99 15 91