Iraq

  • National Implications of the Kurdish Elections in Iraq

    National Implications of the Kurdish Elections in Iraq

    Michael Knights
    September 09, 2009

    The July 2009 provincial elections changed not only political life in Iraqi Kurdistan, but also the outlook for national elections in January 2010.

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  • The Status and Future of the Awakening Movements in Iraq

    Michael Knights
    June 02, 2009

    Awakening movement members are being integrated in the country's politics as well as its security forces.

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  • "Wagging the Dog" in Iraq's Elections

    John Tures
    February 04, 2009

    Moqtada al-Sadr's attempts to keep attention on the United States and to associate his political rivals with it reveal his concerns about remaining relevant in Iraqi politics.

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  • Significance of Iraq's Provincial Elections

    Michael Knights
    December 02, 2008

    Provincial elections in January 2009 will provide insights into the health of Iraq's political system and the shifting balance of power among political parties and factions.

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  • How to Enhance Unity and Stability in Iraq

    Muhammad Abu Rumman
    November 11, 2008

    President-elect Obama’s administration must not give any inkling that Iraq is becoming less important to Washington if it wants to shore up real but fragile gains in Iraqi stability.

  • What to Watch for in Iraq Now

    Phebe Marr
    September 09, 2008

    Iraq has reached a political plateau. The U.S. troop surge has stopped the downward spiral in sectarian violence, allowing politics to move in a different direction. There are least three processes to watch: the on-going struggle for power among various parties and groups, recent state building efforts, and the cohesion of the four-party (two Shi’i and two Kurdish) coalition currently in power.

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  • Iraqi Shiites Ascendant

    Kenneth Katzman
    August 26, 2008

    Shiite Islamists are likely to ultimately become the dominant power in post-war Iraq. As the Baath Party is dismantled by the Coalition Provisional Authority, the organizational counterweight to Shiite Islamist power is being weakened, and the Shiite Islamist groups have demonstrated that they are better organized and funded than other non-Baathist groups.

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  • After the Iraqi Elections: High Stakes

    Phebe Marr
    August 26, 2008

    As the elections end, the hard work of constructing the new Iraq begins. While Iraqi voters can congratulate themselves on a remarkable achievement in the face of extraordinary difficulties, the situation remains precarious.

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  • Addressing the Democracy Dilemma in Iraq

    August 26, 2008

    After the first large demonstrations organized by Shiite clerics in Iraq, Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld was asked about the possibility that radical Islamists would rise to power. That, he answered, "ain't gonna happen, I just don't see how that's going to happen."

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  • Political Decompression in Iraq

    August 26, 2008

    Though Iraqi political life since the ouster of Saddam Hussein may appear formless, it is following certain patterns familiar from other post-authoritarian settings. All countries where an authoritarian regime suddenly collapses go through a period of decompression in which political oxygen flows very rapidly into a previously closed system, producing disorientation and confusion.

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  • Kurdistan and a Federal Iraq: How the Kurds Created Facts on the Ground

    Peter W. Galbraith
    August 25, 2008

    As anti-American attacks escalate elsewhere in Iraq, the Kurdistan region remains steadfast in its support of the United States, if not all of the policies of the Coalition Provisional Authority. This does not, however,translate into unconditional support for Bush administration's political objectives in Iraq, which may become painfully obvious when Iraqis finally sit down to write a constitution.

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  • Iraq's Sunni Arabs: Part of the Past, Part of the Future?

    Judith S. Yaphe
    August 25, 2008

    Since the fall of Saddam Hussein, Iraq's Sunni Arab community — estimated to be less than twenty percent of the population — has been demonized and victimized by many inside and outside Iraq. Having dominated Iraq's political, educational, and military institutions since 1920, Sunni Arabs are now frightened by their sudden, dramatic loss of political power, social status, and economic well being.

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  • Can the U.S. Keep Iraq's Shiites Happy?

    Juan Cole
    August 25, 2008

    British officials publicly worried recently that the United States-led coalition occupying Iraq had only about a year before the Shiites of Iraq turned against it. Shiites, the majority in the country, so far have been more welcoming of the coalition military and civilian presence than have Sunni Arabs.

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  • Federalism for Iraq and Lebanon

    Habib C. Malik
    August 25, 2008

    Underlying the political map of the Middle East —those weird straight lines of Sykes-Picot vintage running through the desert— is the real configuration of this enigmatic region: the ethno-religious layout. Kurds, Berbers, Arabs, Christians, Muslims, Jews, Turks, Armenians, Copts, and more, depending on where one decides the Middle East ends.

  • Iraq Needs Territorially-Based Federalism

    Adeed Dawisha
    August 25, 2008

    To date, the United States-led Coalition Provisional Authority has exhibited a strong tendency to appoint Iraqis to political positions based primarily on sectarian and ethnic considerations.

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  • Iraq's New Transition Plan: A Preliminary Analysis

    August 25, 2008

    The Agreement on Political Process signed on November 15 by Ambassador L. Paul Bremer III for the Coalition Provisional Authority and by Jalal Talabani for the Iraqi Governing Council (IGC) provides a much needed and long overdue roadmap for the restoration of sovereignty to an Iraqi government. Unfortunately, the agreement contains numerous clauses that will make implementation quite difficult.

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  • Rebuilding Local Government in Iraq

    August 25, 2008

    In the months since the end of the war, the United States has set up scores of local councils in Iraq's cities and main towns, reaching an estimated 51 percent of the country's population. Put together under emergency conditions, the local councils are not elected, but selected by the civil affairs teams in consultation with Iraqis.

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  • Drafting Islam Into the Iraqi Constitution

    August 25, 2008

    On July 15, 2003, the American administrator of Iraq, L. Paul Bremer III, finally articulated a clear benchmark for ending the Coalition Provisional Authority's administration of Iraq: the governing council's promulgation of a democratic constitution and the subsequent holding of national elections. Bremer has said he expects the constitution writing process to take about six to eight months.

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  • Political Trends among Iraqi Shiites

    Abbas Kadhim
    August 25, 2008

    Since the collapse of the regime of Saddam Hussein, the Shiites of Iraq have come to the forefront of the debate among Western and Arab intellectuals and politicians. A clear majority of more than 60 percent of the population, the Shiites of Iraq have never held a majority or even a powerful minority status in Iraqi politics since the establishment of modern Iraq eight decades ago.

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  • Iraq's Long Road to a Government

    Musab Alkateeb
    August 25, 2008

    Ten weeks after the January 30 elections, Iraqis have chosen a Kurdish president, Shiite and Sunni vice presidents, a Sunni speaker and Shiite deputy speaker of parliament, and now a Shiite prime minister. Why has it taken so long to form the new government?

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