Iraq

  • The Fate of CPA Orders in Iraq after June 30

    August 22, 2008

    When the U.S.-led Coalition Provisional Authority (CPA) dissolves on June 30, it will leave behind a series of enactments designed to remake significant parts of the Iraqi legal order. While the juridical and political basis for the CPA's enactments is shaky, any succeeding Iraqi authority is likely to hesitate before repealing them wholesale.

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  • The Ghosts of Baathists Past and the Predicament of Civic Culture in Iraq

    Ray Salvatore Jennings
    August 22, 2008

    The lingering effect of Baathist-era distortions and intensifying violence are hindering efforts to create a civic culture based on tolerance, cooperation, and individual initiative in Iraq.

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  • Religious Authority and Politics in Post-Saddam Iraq

    David Siddhartha Patel
    August 22, 2008

    Freed from state control, religious authorities—drawing on their moral authority and extensive mass communication networks, and benefiting from the weakness of secular forces—quickly filled the political void created by the fall of Saddam Hussein's regime. A year later, these authorities remain the principal shapers of public opinion among most Iraqi Arabs.

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  • Iraq's Shiite Islamists On the Threshold of Power

    Kenneth Katzman
    August 22, 2008

    Iraq's Shiite Islamists are in an undeniable position of strength as the June 30, 2004 hand-over of sovereignty approaches. Their leadership has gelled with the emergence of Grand Ayatollah Ali Al Sistani, 75, as the major political force in the country.

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  • First Impressions of Iraq's Interim Constitution

    John Stuart Blackton
    August 22, 2008

    On March 8, the Iraqi Governing Council signed Iraq's new interim constitution, known as the Transitional Administrative Law (TAL). The TAL is expected to go into effect on July 1, 2004 and may foreshadow elements of a permanent constitution. It will remain in force until a new government, scheduled to be elected by January 31, 2005, enacts a permanent constitution.

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  • Iraq's Emerging Political Party Scene: Difficult Questions Abound

    Leslie Campbell , Thomas O. Melia
    August 20, 2008

    More than one hundred political parties have been established in Iraq since the fall of Saddam Hussein's regime. Some call themselves "movements," "associations," or "fronts," and they are dedicated variously to democracy, human rights, Islamic values, constitutionalism, federalism, national unity, and ethnic or tribal identity.

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  • Media in the New Iraq

    Karim Alrawi
    August 20, 2008

    The current state of Iraqi media reflects both the pluralism and the chaos of post-war Iraq. There is abundant freedom of expression, especially in northern Iraq, whose semi-autonomy since the early 1990s allowed the Kurds to establish non-Baathist media outlets several years ago.

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  • Shattering the "Politics of Silence:" Satellite Television Talk Shows and the Transformation of Arab Political Culture

    Marc Lynch
    August 20, 2008

    In an appearance on Cairo's "Dream TV" in the spring of 2004, the eminent Egyptian journalist Muhammad Hassanayn Haykal broached the deeply sensitive topic of Gamal Mubarak’s aspirations to succeed his father as president. For his efforts, Haykal was summarily banned from Egyptian broadcasts.

  • Nightmare of Violence Dashes Hopes for a Free Iraqi Press

    Borzou Daragahi
    August 20, 2008

    The 2003 U.S.-led invasion of Iraq and toppling of Saddam Hussein's government dangled the prospect of an Iraq with freedoms of the press unparalleled in the country's history and indeed in the Arab world. The fall of Saddam's regime spawned dozens of new publications and broadcast outlets staffed by Iraqi journalists.

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  • Kurdish Media After the War

    Maggy Zanger
    August 20, 2008

    With sanctions lifted, Saddam Hussein removed from power, and Kurdistan the most secure place in Iraq, Kurdish media have unprecedented potential to thrive.

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  • Will Democracy Become a Habit in Iraq?

    Judith Yaphe
    August 20, 2008

    Each of Iraq's three elections in 2005 has been a landmark event: the first free and transparent election on January 30, the first referendum to approve a constitution on October 15, and now the first election to choose a permanent government on December 15.

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  • The Value of Postponing Iraqi Elections

    Raad Alkadiri
    August 20, 2008

    The U.S. push for elections in Iraq by January 31, 2005 is motivated not just by a desire to meet a prominent deadline on the post-war transition calendar. Many senior U.S. officials also see elections as a crucial palliative to the country’s chronic instability.

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  • Political Dynamics in Advance of Iraq's Parliamentary Elections

    Zaineb Naji, Daud Salman
    August 20, 2008

    Whether the Iraqi constitution is approved or not in the October 15 referendum, there will be new elections in December for the National Assembly and party alignments are beginning to emerge.

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  • Iraq's Constitutional Process Goes Awry

    Joost Hiltermann
    August 20, 2008

    After several missed deadlines, Iraq's constitutional process has yet to produce a draft acceptable to Shiites, Kurds, and Sunni Arabs, and prospects are bleak. Both process and content, currently, are highly problematic.

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  • Iraq's Insurgents: What Do They Want?

    Judith S. Yaphe
    August 20, 2008

    Iraq's insurgencies began with the U.S. military invasion in March 2003 and gained momentum after the fall of Saddam Hussein's regime when the United States moved to dissolve the Iraqi military and implement a sweeping de-Baathification policy.

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  • Assessing Iraq's National Conference

    Kathleen Ridolfo
    August 20, 2008

    After two postponements, the Iraqi National Conference finally took place in Baghdad from August 15-18. The conference, called for in the Transitional Administrative Law (Iraq's interim constitution) and originally scheduled for July, convened 1,300 delegates to select a 100-member interim national assembly.

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  • Iraq's Electoral System: A Misguided Strategy

    Michael Rubin
    August 20, 2008

    With the conclusion of the Iraqi National Conference last month, the next milestone for Iraqi democracy will be the January 2005 elections for a 275-member Parliament. Already, the electoral system chosen for Iraq could dampen the prospects for a representative and democratic vote.

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  • Iraq's Electoral System: A Strategy for Inclusiveness

    Jeff Fischer
    August 20, 2008

    Against the backdrop of strife that plagues much of Iraq, key political institutions and a legal framework have been established for the country's first democratic national elections, anticipated for January. Voters will select a 275-member transitional national assembly, governorate assemblies, and a Kurdish regional assembly

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  • Kurdistan's Tenuous Model

    Bilal A. Wahab
    August 19, 2008

    Iraqi Kurdistan is the best functioning part of Iraq, an example of what stability and governance could theoretically bring to the rest of the country.

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  • The Paradox of Press Freedom in the Arab World

    Kamel Labidi
    August 19, 2008

    The second of June marked the second anniversary of the assassination of Lebanese writer Samir Qasir, with no indication of who ordered the car bombing that silenced one of the loudest Arab voices criticizing autocratic Arab regimes, particularly the Assad family in Syria.

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