event

Stabilizing Sino-Indian Security Relations: Managing Strategic Rivalry After Doklam

Tue. July 10th, 2018
Washington, DC

The Doklam standoff between Indian and Chinese troops in the summer of 2017 coincided with an ongoing deterioration in bilateral relations, and accelerated pre-existing military competition. Frank O’Donnell provides a detailed analysis of Indian and Chinese nuclear and conventional ground force posturing, and illustrates darkening rival perceptions of these actions and their  underlying strategic intentions. Carnegie hosted an expert panel discussion with O'Donnell on his new paper, Stabilizing Sino-Indian Security Relations, which proposes new measures to limit the recurrence of future Doklam-like episodes and their inherent risk of escalation. 

Sameer Lalwani

Sameer Lalwani is senior associate and co-director of the South Asia program at the Stimson Center.

Tanvi Madan

Tanvi Madan is director of the India Project and fellow in the Project on International Order and Strategy in the Foreign Policy program at the Brookings Institution.

Frank O'Donnell

Frank O’Donnell is a Stanton junior faculty fellow at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at Harvard University, and a nonresident fellow in the South Asia program at the Stimson Center. 

George Perkovich

George Perkovich is the Ken Olivier and Angela Nomellini chair and vice president for studies at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

Carnegie does not take institutional positions on public policy issues; the views represented herein are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of Carnegie, its staff, or its trustees.
event speakers

Sameer Lalwani

Stimson Center

Tanvi Madan

Tanvi Madan is the director of The India Project and senior fellow for foreign policy and the Project on International Order and Strategy at the Brookings Institution.

Frank O'Donnell

Frank O’Donnell is a nonresident fellow with Stimson’s South Asia Program. His areas of expertise include nuclear doctrine and posture development, conventional military modernization, and national security policymaking processes in Southern Asia.

George Perkovich

Japan Chair for a World Without Nuclear Weapons, Vice President for Studies

George Perkovich is the Japan chair for a world without nuclear weapons and vice president for studies at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, overseeing the Nuclear Policy Program and the Technology and International Affairs Program. He works primarily on nuclear strategy and nonproliferation issues, and security dilemmas among the United States, its allies, and their nuclear-armed adversaries. 

Carnegie does not take institutional positions on public policy issues; the views represented herein are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of Carnegie, its staff, or its trustees.