From humble beginnings in the 1980s, Hizbullah’s political clout and public perception have trended upward, thanks to a communications strategy that has adapted to changes in the local and regional environment. Carnegie hosted a discussion of the recently released book, The Hizbullah Phenomenon: Politics and Communication by Lina Khatib, Dina Matar, and Atef Alshaer. Carnegie Middle East Center Director Khatib joined Carnegie’s Joseph Bahout to discuss  how Hizbullah’s strategic communication has influenced other Islamist movements in the region, including the Islamic State. Carnegie’s Frederic Wehrey moderated. 

Lina Khatib

Lina Khatib is director of the Carnegie Middle East Center in Beirut. Her research interests include the international relations of the Middle East, Islamist groups, political transitions, and foreign policy. She has also published widely on public diplomacy, political communication, and political participation in the Middle East.

Joseph Bahout

Joseph Bahout is a visiting scholar in the Middle East Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. Follow him on Twitter @jobahout.

Frederic Wehrey

Frederic Wehrey is a senior associate in the Middle East Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. He focuses on Gulf political and security affairs, Libya, and U.S. policy in the Middle East.