Emerging democracies are periodically vulnerable to legitimacy crises by the expansion of popular participation. The recent book Incomplete Democracy in the Asia-Pacific: Evidence from Indonesia, Korea, the Philippines, and Thailand explores the nature of public opinion and the process of day-to-day participation that has made the electoral democracies of Indonesia, South Korea, the Philippines, and Thailand vulnerable to repeated crises. 

Giovanna Dore and Karl D. Jackson presented the main findings of their book and discuss the lack of public demand for good governance that enables continued elite control of these Asian democracies. Vikram Nehru moderated. 

Giovanna Dore

Giovanna Dore is a fellow in the Asian Studies Program at the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies where she focuses on international development and Asian emerging markets.

Karl D. Jackson

Karl D. Jackson is director of the Asian Studies Program and the C.V. Starr Distinguished Professor of Southeast Asian Studies at the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies.

Vikram Nehru

Vikram Nehru is a senior associate in Carnegie’s Asia Program where he focuses on the economic, political, and strategic issues confronting Asia, particularly Southeast Asia.