Francis Fukuyama

Former  Nonresident Senior Associate
Democracy and Rule of Law Program
Francis Fukuyama was a nonresident senior associate in Carnegie’s Democracy and Rule of Law Program, where his research focuses on democratization and international political economy.
Education

Ph.D., Harvard University; B.A., Cornell University

Languages
  • English

Francis Fukuyama is no longer with the Carnegie Endowment.

Francis Fukuyama was a nonresident senior associate in Carnegie’s Democracy and Rule of Law Program, where his research focuses on democratization and international political economy.

Fukuyama is the Olivier Nomellini Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies at Stanford University. He was previously the Bernard L. Schwartz Professor of International Political Economy at the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) of Johns Hopkins University (2001–2010), and remains a senior fellow at SAIS’ Foreign Policy Institute.

He served in the U.S. Department of State as the deputy director for European political-military affairs (1989), and prior to that as a specialist in Middle East affairs for the Policy Planning Staff (1981–1982). He was also a member of the U.S. delegation to the Egyptian–Israeli talks on Palestinian autonomy (1981–1982).

Fukuyama is chairman of the editorial board of the American Interest, which he helped to found. He is also a member of the board of trustees of the Rand Corporation, the advisory boards for the Journal of Democracy, the Inter-American Dialogue, and The New America Foundation.

Fukuyama has written widely on issues relating to democratization and international political economy.  His book, The End of History and the Last Man (Free Press, 1992) has appeared in over twenty foreign editions.  His most recent books are America at the Crossroads:  Democracy, Power, and the Neoconservative Legacy (Yale University Press, 2006) and Falling Behind: Explaining the Development Gap between Latin America and the United States (Oxford University Press, 2008).  His next book, The Origins of Political Order, will be published in March 2011.

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