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Carnegie Endowment for International Peace | Proliferation News
January 13, 2009

2009 Carnegie International Nonproliferation Conference

IN THIS ISSUE
  • The Cost of Nuclear Security
    Los Angeles Times
  • Every Little Helps
    The Economist
  • New Directions for Foreign Relations
    The Boston Globe
  • US Sanctions Those Tied to Pakistani Scientist
    Associated Press
  • U.S. Rejected Aid for Israeli Raid on Iranian Nuclear Site
    The New York Times
  • Iran Using Fronts to Get Bomb Parts From U.S.
    The Washington Post
  • Nuclear Disarmament I: The Key is How to Count the Nukes
    International Herald Tribune
  • Nuclear Disarmament II: Toward a Nuclear-Free World: A German View
    International Herald Tribune
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The Cost of Nuclear Security

Stephen I. Schwartz and Deepti Choubey, Los Angeles Times
B-52 BomberSeven years after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, at a time when government officials and outside experts are expressing growing concern about the prospect of a nuclear 9/11, few members of Congress know how much the United States spends on nuclear security or where the money goes.

When Secretary of State-designate Hillary Rodham Clinton and Secretary of Energy-designate Steven Chu head into their Senate confirmation hearings Tuesday, they'll face difficult questions about how the U.S. is addressing nuclear dangers. Although most lawmakers would rank nuclear threats at the top of their list of national security concerns, they won't have sufficient or comprehensive information to work with. But Congress can fix this.

Every Little Helps

The Economist
Eking out the pennies, working at times with begged-and-borrowed tools, but expected to pit their wits against hard nuclear cases like Iran and North Korea, inspectors at the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) now have two reasons to smile.

New Directions for Foreign Relations

John F. Kerry, The Boston Globe
As Senator Hillary Clinton appears before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee today for confirmation hearings as secretary of state, the foreign policy agenda of the US government is confronting many challenges.

US Sanctions Those Tied to Pakistani Scientist

Foster Klug, Associated Press
The United States on Monday slapped sanctions on people and companies connected to the black market nuclear network led by Pakistani scientist Abdul Qadeer Khan.

U.S. Rejected Aid for Israeli Raid on Iranian Nuclear Site

David E. Sanger, The New York Times
President Bush deflected a secret request by Israel last year for specialized bunker-busting bombs it wanted for an attack on Iran's main nuclear complex and told the Israelis that he had authorized new covert action intended to sabotage Iran's suspected effort to develop nuclear weapons, according to senior American and foreign officials.

Iran Using Fronts to Get Bomb Parts From U.S.

Joby Warrick, The Washington Post
The Iranian businessman was looking for high-quality American electronics, but he had to act stealthily: The special parts he coveted were denied to Iranians, especially those seeking to make roadside bombs to kill U.S. troops in Iraq.

Nuclear Disarmament I: The Key is How to Count the Nukes

Lance W. Lord, International Herald Tribune
In salary negotiations in the business world, there's a simple axiom: The first person who mentions a number loses. The same is true for arms-control negotiations. When one side tips its hand by revealing its numerical goal, the other side has a distinct advantage.

Nuclear Disarmament II: Toward a Nuclear-Free World: A German View

Helmut Schmidt, Richard von Weizsäcker, Egon Bahr and Hans-Dietrich Genscher, International Herald Tribune
In 2007 Henry Kissinger, George Schultz, William Perry and Sam Nunn issued an appeal for a world free of nuclear weapons.

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Produced twice-weekly, Proliferation News provides a free summary of news and analysis on efforts to prevent the spread and use of nuclear weapons. Visit Carnegie's Nonproliferation Program website for further information and resources. Please send your comments and suggestions to the Editor at proliferationnews@carnegieendowment.org.

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