View the Mobile Version
Carnegie Endowment for International Peace | Proliferation News
April 14, 2009

2009 Carnegie International Nonproliferation Conference

IN THIS ISSUE
  • U.S. May Drop Key Condition for Talks With Iran
    The New York Times
  • N. Korea Says It Will Boycott Nuclear Talks, Restart Weapons Plant
    The Washington Post
  • Good and Bad Nuclear Weapons. Berlin's Part in Shaping Nuclear Reality
    Körber Policy Paper
  • Foreign Minister Wants US Nukes Out of Germany
    Der Spiegel
  • Taking the Bang Out of Nuclear Weapons
    The Moscow Times
  • Russia Missile Arsenal 80 Percent New by 2016: General
    Agence France-Presse
Add Carnegie
RSS Feeds
Carnegie experts and analyses straight to your desktop or mobile device.

U.S. May Drop Key Condition for Talks With Iran

David E. Sanger, The New York Times
NatanzThe Obama administration and its European allies are preparing proposals that would shift strategy toward Iran by dropping a longstanding American insistence that Tehran rapidly shut down nuclear facilities during the early phases of negotiations over its atomic program, according to officials involved in the discussions.

The proposals, exchanged in confidential strategy sessions with European allies, would press Tehran to open up its nuclear program gradually to wide-ranging inspection. But the proposals would also allow Iran to continue enriching uranium for some period during the talks.

N. Korea Says It Will Boycott Nuclear Talks, Restart Weapons Plant

Blaine Harden, The Washington Post
Fuming at the U.N. Security Council for condemning its recent missile launch, North Korea said Tuesday it will restart its plutonium factory, junk all its disarmament agreements and "never participate" again in six-country nuclear negotiations.

Good and Bad Nuclear Weapons. Berlin's Part in Shaping Nuclear Reality (PDF)

Michael Rühle, Körber Policy Paper
Editor's Note: How to maintain confidence in extended deterrence is one of the important, complicated challenges that arises from President Obama's call for movement toward a nuclear-weapon free world. Germany's views on the subject will weigh heavily. This report by Michael Rühle, Deputy Director of Policy Planning in the Private Office of the Secretary General of NATO, presents a cogent, provocative argument for Germany to come out clearly in favor of NATO remaining a nuclear alliance.

Foreign Minister Wants US Nukes Out of Germany

Der Spiegel
Reacting to Obama's vision of a nuclear-free world, German Foreign Minister Steinmeier has called for American nuclear weapons to be removed from Germany. His stance is in opposition to Chancellor Merkel, who wants to keep the bombs to secure Germany's say in NATO.

Taking the Bang Out of Nuclear Weapons

Daryl G. Kimball, The Moscow Times
In a stirring speech delivered in Prague a week ago, U.S. President Barack Obama outlined his vision for strengthening global efforts to curb the spread of nuclear weapons, moving forward on long-overdue disarmament measures and preventing nuclear terrorism. Most important, he articulated "America's commitment to seek the peace and security of a world without nuclear weapons."

Russia Missile Arsenal 80 Percent New by 2016: General

Agence France-Presse
New rockets will by 2016 account for at least 80 percent of the strategic missile forces in Russia as it replaces its Soviet-era arsenal with new nuclear-capable missiles, the military said Friday.

ABOUT US

Produced twice-weekly, Proliferation News provides a free summary of news and analysis on efforts to prevent the spread and use of nuclear weapons. Visit Carnegie's Nonproliferation Program website for further information and resources. Please send your comments and suggestions to the Editor at proliferationnews@carnegieendowment.org.

Unsubscribe | E-mail the Editor | Archive

Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, 1779 Massachusetts Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20036-2103
Phone: 202.483.7600  |  Fax: 202.483.1840  |  E-mail: proliferationnews@carnegieendowment.org