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Carnegie Endowment for International Peace | Proliferation News
May 19, 2009

2009 Carnegie International Nonproliferation Conference

IN THIS ISSUE
  • Obama Tells Netanyahu He Has an Iran Timetable
    The New York Times
  • Russia, U.S. Hold Talks on Cutting Nuclear Weapons
    Reuters
  • Pakistan is Rapidly Adding Nuclear Arms, U.S. Says
    The New York Times
  • France Offers Pakistan Nuclear Energy Help
    Agence France-Presse
  • Developing Nations Seek Assurances on Nuclear Arms
    The Washington Post
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Obama Tells Netanyahu He Has an Iran Timetable

Sheryl Gay Stolberg, The New York Times
Obama-Netanyahu meetingPresident Obama said Monday that he expected to know by the end of the year whether Iran was making "a good-faith effort to resolve differences" in talks aimed at ending its nuclear program, signaling to Israel as well as Iran that his willingness to engage in diplomacy over the issue has its limits.

"We're not going to have talks forever," Mr. Obama told Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel after a two-hour session in the Oval Office.

Russia, U.S. Hold Talks on Cutting Nuclear Weapons

Denis Sinyakov, Reuters
The United States and Russia on Tuesday held talks aimed at cutting stockpiles of nuclear weapons, a move that could herald a thaw in relations between the former Cold War foes.

Pakistan is Rapidly Adding Nuclear Arms, U.S. Says

Thom Shanker and David E. Sanger, The New York Times
Editor's Note: The Institute for Science and International Security (ISIS) has released two reports today with satellite imagery revealing the expansion of two nuclear sites key to Pakistan's nuclear weapons program.

Members of Congress have been told in confidential briefings that Pakistan is rapidly adding to its nuclear arsenal even while racked by insurgency, raising questions on Capitol Hill about whether billions of dollars in proposed military aid might be diverted to Pakistan's nuclear program.

France Offers Pakistan Nuclear Energy Help

Agence France-Presse
Editor's Note: There have been conflicting reports on what exactly the deal reached by France and Pakistan entails. Pakistani Foreign Minister Shah Mahmood Qureshi insisted that "France has agreed to transfer civilian nuclear technology to Pakistan" along the lines of the U.S.-India nuclear cooperation agreement, while a spokesperson for French President Nicolas Sarkozy said that France had agreed only to "cooperate with Pakistan in the field of nuclear safety." The kind of nuclear cooperation that Pakistan wants is not possible without another exception to Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) rules.

France and Pakistan have agreed to cooperate in the nuclear field, officials said Friday, with Islamabad claiming an important breakthrough in its bid to be seen as a responsible nuclear power.

Developing Nations Seek Assurances on Nuclear Arms

Colum Lynch, The Washington Post
U.N. nuclear talks hit a roadblock Friday as Cuba, Iran and other developing nations demanded that the five original nuclear powers accept legally binding commitments to dismantle their nuclear arsenals and provide assurances they will not use such weapons against states that do not possess atomic weapons.

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Produced twice-weekly, Proliferation News provides a free summary of news and analysis on efforts to prevent the spread and use of nuclear weapons. Visit Carnegie's Nonproliferation Program website for further information and resources. Please send your comments and suggestions to the Editor at proliferationnews@carnegieendowment.org.

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