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Carnegie Endowment for International Peace | Proliferation News
July 16, 2009
IN THIS ISSUE
  • Rebutting the Standard Arguments against Disarmament
    Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists
  • Why We Don't Want a Nuclear-Free World
    The Wall Street Journal
  • Iranian Nuke Chief Resigns
    Associated Press
  • UN Discuss Sanctions to Target NKorean Individuals
    Agence France-Presse
  • Bin Laden Deputy Warns Pakistan the US Wants to Seize Its Nuclear Arsenal
    The Guardian
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Rebutting the Standard Arguments against Disarmament

George Perkovich and James M. Acton, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists
MinutemanIn any debate, there is a tendency to set up and knock down straw men. The emerging debate about whether the United States should work toward abolishing nuclear weapons is no different.

Certainly, there is much room for serious disagreement about whether a nuclear-weapon-free world is achievable or even worthwhile. In fact, such discussion is welcomed. Unfortunately, opponents of abolishing nuclear weapons tend to make their case by rebutting a selection of five weak arguments that the growing bipartisan movement of nuclear zero supporters led by realists such as Henry Kissinger, George Shultz, Bill Perry and Sam Nunn rarely use.

Why We Don't Want a Nuclear-Free World

Melanie Kirkpatrick, The Wall Street Journal
Editor's Note: In an appearance on CNBC's morning show, Senator Sam Nunn responds to the following Wall Street Journal article, in which former Defense Secretary James Schlesinger is quoted as saying that the United States needs a strong deterrent and should keep its nuclear weapons "more or less in perpetuity." Senator Nunn said that while a strong US deterrent and nuclear umbrella are important, he fundamentally disagrees that the US should keep its nuclear weapons forever because "if we do that, you can toss the Non-Proliferation Treaty right out of the window, and you can toss cooperation around the globe out the window, and you will not be able to take the steps necessary to protect America from proliferation and from catastrophic nuclear terrorism."

Iranian Nuke Chief Resigns

Nasser Karimi, Associated Press
The head of Iran's nuclear agency has resigned, an Iranian news agency reported Thursday, a move that may have been connected to the country's postelection turmoil.

UN Discuss Sanctions to Target NKorean Individuals

Agence France-Presse
The UN Security Council is discussing sanctions which for the first time will target individuals involved in North Korea's nuclear and missile programmes, a South Korean official has said.

Bin Laden Deputy Warns Pakistan the US Wants to Seize Its Nuclear Arsenal

Delcan Walsh, The Guardian
Osama bin Laden's deputy, Ayman al-Zawahiri, has attempted to halt al-Qaida's plunging popularity in Pakistan by exploiting widely held fears that the US is plotting to seize the country's nuclear bombs.

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Produced twice-weekly, Proliferation News provides a free summary of news and analysis on efforts to prevent the spread and use of nuclear weapons. Visit Carnegie's Nonproliferation Program website for further information and resources. Please send your comments and suggestions to the Editor at proliferationnews@carnegieendowment.org.

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