Proliferation News
» MAY 10, 2011
 

How to Reduce Pakistan's Leverage

George Perkovich | The New York Times

Nuclear Security Summit

Aid is not the only independent variable that affects Pakistan. Other things the U.S. says and does are important, too.

For example, the United States' effort to help India become a global power, including by building up its nuclear and advanced conventional armories, makes the Pakistani establishment ever more angry and distrustful of the United States. The deployment of unaccountable mercenaries like Raymond Davis turns average Pakistanis against the U.S. These and other U.S. policies, including drone attacks in the tribal areas, may be tactically necessary because Pakistan's own security establishment will not do its best to counter terrorists acting against India and Afghanistan. India's growing power and importance inevitably will make the U.S. and others seek favorable terms of cooperation with it.   Full Article



Follow the Nuclear Policy Program
RSS News Feed Twitter
Footer information begins here
More from Proliferation News

Steve Gutterman | Reuters
The generating unit at Iran's first atomic power plant was brought up to the "minimum controllable level of power" on Sunday, Atomstroyexport, the state company that builds nuclear plants abroad, said in a statement.     Full Article

 
 
Related Analysis
Yochi J. Dreazen | Global Security Newswire
Last week's U.S. raid into Pakistan is fueling one of the country's most enduring -- and potentially dangerous -- conspiracy theories: that the U.S. has designs on Pakistan's nuclear arsenal and is prepared to send highly trained commandos into the country to seize control of the weapons.     Full Article

The Korea Herald
The nuclear materials found in Libya in 2004 were highly likely to have been produced by North Korea, U.S.-funded broadcaster Voice of America said Saturday, citing an interview with a former senior official of the U.N. nuclear watchdog.     Full Article

Reuters
Republican lawmakers threatened Monday to try to freeze funds for implementing the new START nuclear arms reduction treaty with Russia if the Obama administration breaks a promise to modernize the U.S. nuclear weapons that remain.     Full Article

Farhad Pouladi | Agence France Presse
Iran on Tuesday said it has formally agreed to resume talks on its controversial nuclear programme with six major powers which have been stalled since January.     Full Article

Footer information begins here
Link of Interest

Footer information begins here

Carnegie Resources

Browse     Issues     Regions     Programs     Experts     Events     Publications

Multilingual Content     Русский     中文     عربي

Global Centers     Washington DC     Moscow     Beijing     Beirut     Brussels

Follow Carnegie
RSS News Feeds Facebook Twitter YouTube Scribd

About Proliferation News

Produced twice weekly, Proliferation News provides a free summary of news and analysis on efforts to prevent the spread and use of nuclear weapons. Visit the Carnegie Nuclear Policy Program website for further information and resources. Please send your comments and suggestions to the editor at proliferationnews@carnegieendowment.org.

About the Carnegie Nuclear Policy Program

The Carnegie Nuclear Policy Program is an internationally acclaimed source of expertise and policy thinking on nuclear industry, nonproliferation, security, and disarmament. Its multinational staff stays at the forefront of nuclear policy issues in the United States, Russia, China, Northeast Asia, South Asia, and the Middle East.

About the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

The Carnegie Endowment for International Peace is a private, nonprofit organization dedicated to advancing cooperation between nations and promoting active international engagement by the United States. Founded in 1910, its work is nonpartisan and dedicated to achieving practical results.

As it celebrates its Centennial, the Carnegie Endowment is pioneering the first global think tank, with offices now in Washington, Moscow, Beijing, Beirut, and Brussels. These five locations include the centers of world governance and the places whose political evolution and international policies will most determine the near-term possibilities for international peace and economic advance.

If you would no longer like to receive Proliferation News, please click here to unsubscribe.

Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

1779 Massachusetts Ave, NW, Washington, DC 20036
Phone: 202 483 7600  |  Fax: 202 483 1840  |  Email: info@ceip.org