China and the World

    China's G8 Impact

    • Albert Keidel
    • March 18, 2005
    • Paper presented at the International Symposium

    Those Subtle Chinese

    The Nuclear Dimension of a Taiwan Crisis

    Carnegie's China program hosted Brad Roberts of the Institute for Defense Analyses to explore the different approaches of China and the United States to the nuclear dimensions of a possible Taiwan crisis. Dr. Ashley Tellis of Carnegie served as a commentator, and Dr. Michael Swaine, also of Carnegie, moderated the discussion.

    How Far Has China to Go?

    Illiberal Adaptation: The Chinese Communist Party's Strategy for Survival

    The Carnegie China program held a breakfast seminar during which Dr. Minxin Pei analyzed the CCP's strategy of "illiberal adaptation," one that maximizes the resources of the state to co-opt new social elites, neutralize emerging societal threats, and ward off external pressures for reform.

    China's Peaceful Rise?

    • Jonathan Spence, Zbigniew Brzezinski , John Mearsheimer, Martin Wolf, Ashley J. Tellis, Homi Kharas, Minxin Pei
    • January 01, 2005
    • Foreign Policy, January/February 2005

    See what these leading experts have to say on such key questions as, are the United States and China on a collision course? And, what are the economic and strategic implications of China's transformation?

    The Once and Future China

    • Jonathan Spence
    • January 01, 2005
    • Foreign Policy

    Despite its incredible pace of change, China continues to carry echoes of its past. And yet, the difficulty of drawing any direct links between its past and present is demonstrated by the fact that any topic can shift in perspective depending on where you enter China’s vast chronology.

    Clash of the Titans

    • Zbigniew Brzezinski, John Mearsheimer
    • January 01, 2005
    • Foreign Policy

    A Grand Chessboard

    Beijing seeks to reassure the world that it is a gentle giant. This strategy of emphasizing peaceful ascendancy will likely satisfy Chinese interests until it becomes a true rival of the United States. Washington should recognize that if it mishandles its relations with its current or prospective partners, it might be faced with an absence of allies precisely when it needs them most.

    Dangerous Denials

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