Economic Risk in Asia

    China after the 16th Party Congress

    On November 16-17, the China Program sponsored a two-day conference, "China after the 16th Party Congress," at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. Twelve leading political scientists, economists, and sociologists from China, the United States, Hong Kong, and Singapore met to discuss recent trends in the Chinese economy, politics, society, and foreign policy.

    Rebalancing United States-China Relations

    Shoring Up Sino-US Ties

    Corruption and Anti-corruption Strategies in China

    Discussion on corruption in China with Angang Hu, Qinghua University

    Future Shock: The WTO and Political Change in China

    Reinventing Japan: Immigration's Role in Shaping Japan's Future

    Much attention has been given to Japan's need to restructure its economy and its bureaucracy, but little critical analysis has addressed the necessary role of immigration policy in Japan's reform process. A series of economic, demographic, and political factors are converging to require that Japan adopt a more open policy toward immigration if it is to ensure its place as a global leader.

    Interpreting China's Grand Strategy

    The book reveals why managing the rise of China constitutes one of the most important challenges facing the United States in the early 21st century.

    Present Danger

    Last week, while many China experts inside and outside the Clinton administration were confidently predicting that China would not escalate the conflict with Taiwan, others warned that Beijing might well be contemplating an attack. This turned out to be correct.

    Money Trap

    China's success in shaping American foreign policy through the American business community has been extraordinary. If the wealth created in the Chinese economic miracle sows seeds of future political pressures from a new entrepreneurial class, that same wealth also provides the Beijing government and its army with the muscle to rebuff internal and external pressures for political reform.

    What China Knows That We Don't: The Case for a New Strategy of Containment

    The Chinese leadership views the world today in much the same way Kaiser Wilhelm II did a century ago: The present world order serves the needs of the United States and its allies, which constructed it. And it is poorly suited to the needs of a Chinese dictatorship trying to maintain power at home and increase its clout abroad.

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