Publications

    • Op-Ed

    China's Fragile Mindset

    • Op-Ed

    National Humiliation

    • Robert Kagan, William Kristol
    • April 09, 2001
    • The Weekly Standard

    Whatever risks may accompany a policy of containment, the risks of weakness are infinitely greater. China hands both inside and outside the administration will argue that this crisis needs to be put behind us so that the U.S.-China relationship can return to normal. It is past time for everyone to wake up to the fact that the Chinese behavior we have seen this past week is normal.

    • Op-Ed

    China's Game of Chicken

    In the coming weeks, an army of China experts is going to tell us that selling advanced arms to Taiwan is too risky. If history is any guide, however, it will be even riskier if Beijing thinks it is dealing with another "young and weak" American president.

    • Policy Outlook

    Future Shock: The WTO and Political Change in China

    • Op-Ed

    Internet and Asia: Broadband or Broad Bans?

    Civil society is not the only group of actors which recognizes the potential political power of the Internet. Authoritarian governments are wary of the political communication the Internet makes possible. Many have pushed measures to control the technology and shape the Internet's development to their needs.

    • Op-Ed

    It's Not the Politics, Stupid

    • Op-Ed

    Cyber Censors: A Thousand Web Sites Almost Bloom

    Ultimately, China's attempts to manipulate the private sector will be only one of a number of factors determining the success and transformative power of the Internet in the Middle Kingdom. Domestic and foreign entrepreneurship might very well eventually play their hand in helping to open up the country's economic and political system.

    • Op-Ed

    Why the Rush to Favor China?

    President Clinton is correct that the decision to grant China permanent most-favored-nation trading status will have a historic significance equal to Richard Nixon's opening to China and Jimmy Carter's normalization of relations. But if that's true, why is the president rushing Congress to make a hasty decision, with almost no time to consider the merits and consequences of this momentous step?

    • Op-Ed

    Present Danger

    Last week, while many China experts inside and outside the Clinton administration were confidently predicting that China would not escalate the conflict with Taiwan, others warned that Beijing might well be contemplating an attack. This turned out to be correct.

    • Op-Ed

    Pressuring Taiwan, Appeasing Beijing

    The official U.S. posture of prostration before Beijing -- the China hands call it "engagement" -- would be merely pitiful, perhaps even amusing, were it not so dangerous. But the Clinton administration is now applying its strategy of appeasement to the brewing crisis over Taiwan, and the result may be to hasten the military conflict the administration is trying to avoid.

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