• Op-Ed

    The State of War

    Addressing the forms of violence that plague the world today requires international actors to acknowledge that tackling state repression and organized crime necessitates looking beyond technical quick fixes. The private and social sectors also have an important role to play.

    • Article

    Making Better Use of Lessons From Abroad For American Democracy

    Ideas, experiences, and lessons from other countries are not panaceas but, if properly researched, disseminated, and discussed, they can magnify the reform moment in the United States.

    • TV/Radio Broadcast

    Ending Epidemics of Violence

    Repression can incite greater disorder within a region and export violence to other places. Instead, to heal a society of epidemic violence requires the middle class helped by social organizers and politicians willing to make deals.

    • TV/Radio Broadcast

    A Cure for Massive Violence

    • Rachel Kleinfeld
    • January 17, 2019
    • How Do We Fix It?: A Repair Manual For the Real World

    Decivilization can happen anywhere when violence becomes regularized. However, recovery is possible when complicit states reform and regular people, especially the middle class, address the violence and disorder in their communities.

    • TV/Radio Broadcast

    Science Salon: A Savage Order

    Getting on the road to recivilization requires fixing violent and corrupt systems. Such reform can shift the incentives on the ground and may provide an opportunity for deeper change in society.

    • Op-Ed

    Reconstruction Redux

    While the road out of today’s extreme political polarization in the United States isn’t obvious, adopting reforms like ranked choice voting could reduce polarization and better represent the will of the people.

    • TV/Radio Broadcast

    The World’s Most Violent Places Are Not at War

    Highly unequal societies are some of the most violent places on earth. Recovery requires an attentive middle class and politicians willing to make deals.

    • TV/Radio Broadcast

    Overcoming Violence

    The distinction between political and criminal violence is not as stark as many think. When governments become complicit with violence these distinctions begin to blur.

    • Q&A

    Why Are Some Societies So Violent, and Can They Be Made Safe?

    The world’s most violent places aren’t at war. They are polarized, unequal democracies. Here’s how to make them safer.

    • TV/Radio Broadcast

    Can Violent Countries Get Better?

    • Rachel Kleinfeld
    • November 09, 2018
    • Carnegie Council for Ethics and International Affairs

    Really violent places can get better, but it is not an easy path.

Featured

Carnegie Experts on
Democracy, Conflict, and Governance

  • expert thumbnail - Brechenmacher
    Saskia Brechenmacher
    Associate Fellow
    Democracy, Conflict, and Governance Program
    Saskia Brechenmacher is an associate fellow in Carnegie’s Democracy, Conflict, and Governance Program, where her research focuses on gender, conflict, and governance, as well as trends in civic activism and civil society repression.
  • expert thumbnail - Brown
    Frances Z. Brown
    Fellow
    Democracy, Conflict, and Governance Program
    Frances Z. Brown is a fellow with Carnegie’s Democracy, Conflict, and Governance Program, where she researches stabilization, state building, democratization, decentralization, drivers of conflict, and local governance in fragile states.
  • expert thumbnail - Carothers
    Thomas Carothers
    Senior Vice President for Studies
    Carothers is a leading authority on international support for democracy, human rights, governance, the rule of law, and civil society.
  • expert thumbnail - Dunne
    Michele Dunne
    Director and Senior Fellow
    Middle East Program
    Dunne is an expert on political and economic change in Arab countries, particularly Egypt, as well as U.S. policy in the Middle East.
  • Steven Feldstein
    Nonresident Fellow
    Democracy, Conflict, and Governance Program
    Steven Feldstein is a nonresident fellow in Carnegie’s Democracy, Conflict, and Governance Program, where he focuses on issues of democracy, technology, human rights, U.S. foreign policy, conflict trends, and Africa.
  • expert thumbnail - Hamzawy
    Amr Hamzawy
    Nonresident Senior Fellow
    Middle East Program
    Democracy, Conflict, and Governance Program
    Amr Hamzawy studied political science and developmental studies in Cairo, The Hague, and Berlin.
  • expert thumbnail - Kleinfeld
    Rachel Kleinfeld
    Senior Fellow
    Democracy, Conflict, and Governance Program
    Kleinfeld is a senior fellow in the Democracy, Conflict, and Governance Program. She was the founding CEO of the Truman National Security Project.
  • expert thumbnail - Vaishnav
    Milan Vaishnav
    Director and Senior Fellow
    South Asia Program
    Vaishnav’s primary research focus is the political economy of India, and he examines issues such as corruption and governance, state capacity, distributive politics, and electoral behavior.
  • Jodi Vittori
    Nonresident Scholar
    Jodi Vittori is a nonresident scholar in the Democracy, Conflict, and Governance Program. She is an expert on the linkages of corruption, state fragility, illicit finance, and U.S. national security.
  • expert thumbnail - Youngs
    Richard Youngs
    Senior Fellow
    Democracy, Conflict, and Governance Program
    Youngs is an expert on the foreign policy of the European Union, in particular on questions of democracy support.
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