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    • Proliferation Analysis

    Bush Backs Russian Programs

    • January 04, 2002

    After a year-long review, the Bush administration has announced plans to continue U.S. efforts to deal with the nonproliferation risks posed by the state of the Russian weapons complex. It remains to be seen how all threat reduction programs will fare in the next budget, but it appears that the administration has overcome its initial skepticism regarding these programs and their benefits for U.S. security.

    • Op-Ed

    In the Wake of 11 September, Where Does Missile Defense Fit in Security Spending Priorities?

    • Proliferation Analysis

    Toward a New Mulitilateral Approach to Security

    • December 22, 2001

    UN Under-Secretary General Jayantah Dhanapala said January 22, "The terrorist acts of 11 September have shaken the world out of a dangerous complacency. The public, concerned groups, and legislators are now starting to take much more seriously not only the threat of terrorism but also the danger that WMD may actually be used against military or civilian targets." Read excerpts from his speech to the Arms Control Association.

    • Proliferation Analysis

    Just When You Thought It Was Safe To Go Multilateral. . .

    • December 12, 2001

    The United States will soon become the first nation since World War II to withdraw from a major international security agreement. President Bush's abrogation of the ABM treaty will undermine President Putin in Russia, alienate U.S. allies, antagonize China, polarize domestic debate and weaken national security. Ironically, it will also expose the fragility of missile defense plans. It has been technology, not treaties, limiting effective defenses.

    • Proliferation Analysis

    The START I Milestone: What Does it Mean to the United States?

    • December 07, 2001

    The United States and Russian Federation reached an important arms control milestone on December 5 when both sides completed reductions in the strategic nuclear arsenals to 6,000 accountable weapons each, as required under the START I Treaty. These reductions are a massive reduction from the size of the nuclear arsenals both countries deployed when the agreement was signed in 1991, and demonstrate the value of negotiated, verified arms reduction agreements in U.S. security policy.

    • Proliferation Analysis

    A Fair-Weather System?

    • December 03, 2001

    Bad weather twice postponed the intercept test scheduled for the Ground-based Midcourse Defense program, previously known as National Missile Defense. Weather plays a much greater role than most realize in the success of these demonstrations. The official reason for cancellation is that the poor weather at Vandenburg Air Force Base "did not meet range safety requirements." High winds at the test site may have been enough to force a postponement, but less than ideal weather could mean that the interceptors cannot intercept at all.

    • New Leaders, New Directions: Proliferation 2001

      • Op-Ed

      Look Deep Into Putin's Eyes and Seal the Deal

      President Bush said in May that he wanted to build a new "strategic framework" for nuclear relations between the United States and Russia. Six months later, he has taken a significant step in that direction with the announcement Tuesday of intentions to reduce U.S. nuclear forces and of a hoped-for compromise on missile defense to be worked out at Crawford, Texas, in days to come.

      • Proliferation Analysis

      Does the Size of the Russian Nuclear Arsenal Matter?

      • November 13, 2001

      Homeowners all across America are renegotiating their mortgages to lock in historically low interest rates. President Bush should do the same this week with nuclear weapons. He and President Vladimir Putin should take advantage of historically good relations to lock in deep reductions to both nations’ nuclear arsenals.

      • Op-Ed

      U.S. Must Help Russia Diminish Nuclear Risk

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    Carnegie Experts on
    Nuclear Policy

    • expert thumbnail - Acton
      James M. Acton
      Jessica T. Mathews Chair
      Co-director
      Nuclear Policy Program
      Acton holds the Jessica T. Mathews Chair and is co-director of the Nuclear Policy Program and a senior fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.
    • expert thumbnail - Dalton
      Toby Dalton
      Co-director
      Nuclear Policy Program
      Dalton is the co-director of the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment. An expert on nonproliferation and nuclear energy, his work addresses regional security challenges and the evolution of the global nuclear order.
    • expert thumbnail - Hibbs
      Mark Hibbs
      Senior Fellow
      Nuclear Policy Program
      Hibbs is a Germany-based senior fellow in Carnegie’s Nuclear Policy Program. His areas of expertise are nuclear verification and safeguards, multilateral nuclear trade policy, international nuclear cooperation, and nonproliferation arrangements.
    • expert thumbnail - Kassenova
      Togzhan Kassenova
      Nonresident Fellow
      Nuclear Policy Program
      Kassenova is a nonresident fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment.
    • expert thumbnail - Kühn
      Ulrich Kühn
      Nonresident Scholar
      Ulrich Kühn is a nonresident scholar at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, and a senior researcher at the Institute for Peace Research and Security Policy at the University of Hamburg (IFSH).
    • expert thumbnail - Kurokawa
      Tomoko Kurokawa
      Nonresident Scholar
      Nuclear Policy Program
      Kurokawa is a nonresident scholar in the Carnegie Nuclear Policy Program.
    • expert thumbnail - Levite
      Ariel (Eli) Levite
      Nonresident Senior Fellow
      Nuclear Policy Program
      Levite was the principal deputy director general for policy at the Israeli Atomic Energy Commission from 2002 to 2007.
    • expert thumbnail - Bin
      Li Bin
      Senior Fellow
      Nuclear Policy Program and Asia Program
      Li is a senior fellow working jointly in the Nuclear Policy Program and Asia Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.
    • expert thumbnail - Narang
      Vipin Narang
      Nonresident Scholar
      Nuclear Policy Program
      Vipin Narang is a nonresident scholar in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.
    • expert thumbnail - Perkovich
      George Perkovich
      Ken Olivier and Angela Nomellini Chair
      Vice President for Studies
      Perkovich works primarily on nuclear strategy and nonproliferation issues; cyberconflict; and new approaches to international public-private management of strategic technologies.
    • expert thumbnail - Robinson Snowden
      Mareena Robinson Snowden
      Stanton Nuclear Security Fellow
      Nuclear Policy Program
      Mareena Robinson Snowden is a Stanton nuclear security fellow with the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.
    • expert thumbnail - Ülgen
      Sinan Ülgen
      Visiting Scholar
      Carnegie Europe
      Ülgen is a visiting scholar at Carnegie Europe in Brussels, where his research focuses on Turkish foreign policy, nuclear policy, cyberpolicy, and transatlantic relations.
    • expert thumbnail - Volpe
      Tristan Volpe
      Nonresident Fellow
      Nuclear Policy Program
      Tristan Volpe is a nonresident fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and assistant professor of defense analysis at the Naval Postgraduate School.
    • expert thumbnail - Yoshida
      Fumihiko Yoshida
      Nonresident Scholar
      Nuclear Policy Program
      Fumihiko Yoshida is a nonresident scholar at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.
    • expert thumbnail - Zhao
      Tong Zhao
      Fellow
      Carnegie-Tsinghua Center for Global Policy
      Tong Zhao is a fellow in Carnegie’s Nuclear Policy Program based at the Carnegie–Tsinghua Center for Global Policy.
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