All

    • Proliferation Analysis

    India's Choice

    • October 18, 2001

    U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell traveled to South Asia, at least in part "to lower the temperature," over Kashmir. On October 15 the urgency of his mission was dramatized by the Indian shelling across the Line of Control at Pakistani positions. There is fear that heightened tensions and heated rhetoric might spill over into unintended military escalation in the mountains of Kashmir.

    • Event

    The Khatami Presidency and Emerging Patterns in Iranian Foreign Policy

    A Carnegie Proliferation Roundtable

    • Op-Ed

    U.S. Needs A Contingency Plan For Pakistan's Nuclear Arsenal

    • Proliferation Analysis

    Two Steps Forward, One Step Back

    • October 15, 2001

    The Bush-Putin arms control roller-coaster took another turn for the worse last Thursday when President Bush stated in no uncertain terms that he will continue to press his Russian counterpart on the need to scrap the 1972 ABM Treaty. In one fell swoop, the administration hopes not only to implement its 'new strategic relationship' with Russia sans the ABM Treaty, but also speed development and deployment of its missile defense program at home. Such a move, however, makes achieving the Administration's near term goal of deploying a missile defense with Russia's blessing harder, and could result in long-term damage to the U.S.- Russian relationship.

    • Book

    India's Emerging Nuclear Posture: Between Recessed Deterrent and Ready Arsenal

    This book examines the forces—political, strategic, technological, and ideational—that led to India's dramatic nuclear policy shift and describes how New Delhi's force-in-being will be fashioned, particularly in light of the threat India faces from its two most salient adversaries, China, and Pakistan.

    • Proliferation Analysis

    Russian WMD as a Terrorist Threat

    • October 08, 2001

    An internal government report, obtained by an outside watch-dog group, reveals that America's 10 nuclear weapons research and production facilities are vulnerable to terrorist attack and have failed about half of recent security drills. In several cases, commando squads were able to capture enough nuclear materials to make nuclear weapons. If this report scares you, then just imagine how much worse things are in Russia, with its huge and under-funded nuclear weapons complex.

    • Proliferation Analysis

    The Other "Bomb in the Basement"

    • October 04, 2001

    Lost amid the commotion surrounding the September 11 terrorist attacks were alarming comments made earlier in the month by former Israeli Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu urging Israel to openly deploy nuclear weapons and abandon its policy of strategic ambiguity. How the world deals with the Israeli "bomb in the basement" at this critical point in time could have lasting affects on the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction in the Middle East and beyond.

    • Proliferation Analysis

    This War Will Not Be Televised

    • October 04, 2001

    Military operations appear imminent as Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld takes a swing through the Middle East and Central Asia. But this will not be like previous wars. Don't expect to see explosions behind CNN reporters. The targets will be select, precise and far from telephoto lenses.

    • Proliferation Analysis

    Terror Attacks and Hope for the U.S.-Russian Relationship

    • October 01, 2001

    Closer than expected cooperation between Moscow and Washington opens the door to a genuine improvement of the relationship between the two former cold war adversaries in ways not seen since the early days of Russian reform in the 1990s. There is a broad belief in Moscow that a genuine opportunity to build trust, confidence and a true security partnership has developed out of the rubble in New York and Washington.

    • Event

    Pakistan's Nuclear Dilemma

    A Carnegie Proliferation Roundtable
    Transcript of Event

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Carnegie Experts on
Nuclear Policy

  • expert thumbnail - Acton
    James M. Acton
    Jessica T. Mathews Chair
    Co-director
    Nuclear Policy Program
    Acton holds the Jessica T. Mathews Chair and is co-director of the Nuclear Policy Program and a senior fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.
  • expert thumbnail - Dalton
    Toby Dalton
    Co-director
    Nuclear Policy Program
    Dalton is the co-director of the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment. An expert on nonproliferation and nuclear energy, his work addresses regional security challenges and the evolution of the global nuclear order.
  • expert thumbnail - Hibbs
    Mark Hibbs
    Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program
    Hibbs is a Germany-based senior fellow in Carnegie’s Nuclear Policy Program. His areas of expertise are nuclear verification and safeguards, multilateral nuclear trade policy, international nuclear cooperation, and nonproliferation arrangements.
  • expert thumbnail - Kassenova
    Togzhan Kassenova
    Nonresident Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program
    Kassenova is a nonresident fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment.
  • expert thumbnail - Kühn
    Ulrich Kühn
    Nonresident Scholar
    Ulrich Kühn is a nonresident scholar at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, and a senior researcher at the Institute for Peace Research and Security Policy at the University of Hamburg (IFSH).
  • expert thumbnail - Kurokawa
    Tomoko Kurokawa
    Nonresident Scholar
    Nuclear Policy Program
    Kurokawa is a nonresident scholar in the Carnegie Nuclear Policy Program.
  • expert thumbnail - Levite
    Ariel (Eli) Levite
    Nonresident Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program
    Levite was the principal deputy director general for policy at the Israeli Atomic Energy Commission from 2002 to 2007.
  • expert thumbnail - Bin
    Li Bin
    Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program and Asia Program
    Li is a senior fellow working jointly in the Nuclear Policy Program and Asia Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.
  • expert thumbnail - Narang
    Vipin Narang
    Nonresident Scholar
    Nuclear Policy Program
    Vipin Narang is a nonresident scholar in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.
  • expert thumbnail - Perkovich
    George Perkovich
    Ken Olivier and Angela Nomellini Chair
    Vice President for Studies
    Perkovich works primarily on nuclear strategy and nonproliferation issues; cyberconflict; and new approaches to international public-private management of strategic technologies.
  • expert thumbnail - Robinson Snowden
    Mareena Robinson Snowden
    Stanton Nuclear Security Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program
    Mareena Robinson Snowden is a Stanton nuclear security fellow with the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.
  • expert thumbnail - Ülgen
    Sinan Ülgen
    Visiting Scholar
    Carnegie Europe
    Ülgen is a visiting scholar at Carnegie Europe in Brussels, where his research focuses on Turkish foreign policy, nuclear policy, cyberpolicy, and transatlantic relations.
  • expert thumbnail - Volpe
    Tristan Volpe
    Nonresident Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program
    Tristan Volpe is a nonresident fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and assistant professor of defense analysis at the Naval Postgraduate School.
  • expert thumbnail - Yoshida
    Fumihiko Yoshida
    Nonresident Scholar
    Nuclear Policy Program
    Fumihiko Yoshida is a nonresident scholar at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.
  • expert thumbnail - Zhao
    Tong Zhao
    Fellow
    Carnegie-Tsinghua Center for Global Policy
    Tong Zhao is a fellow in Carnegie’s Nuclear Policy Program based at the Carnegie–Tsinghua Center for Global Policy.
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