Encryption Working Group

The Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and Princeton University have convened a small group of experts to advance a more constructive dialogue on encryption policy. The working group consists of former government officials, business representatives, privacy and civil rights advocates, law enforcement experts, and computer scientists. Observers from U.S. federal government agencies attended a select number of working group sessions. Since 2018, the working group has met to discuss a number of important issues related to encryption policy, including how the relevant technologies and uses of encryption will evolve in the future.

Encryption and Law Enforcement

Moving the Encryption Policy Conversation Forward
  • Encryption Working Group
  • September 10, 2019

Since 2018, the working group has discussed how to promote a more pragmatic and constructive debate on the benefits and challenges of the increasing use of encryption and identified specific areas where greater common ground may be possible. The group specifically aims to propose potentially more fruitful ways to evaluate the societal impact, including both benefits and risks, of any proposed approaches that address the impasse over law enforcement access to encrypted data. “Moving the Encryption Policy Conversation Forward” delves more deeply into one particular component of the debate—that on mobile phone encryption—and details a more specific approach to evaluating proposals focusing on law enforcement access to encrypted mobile phones.

Key Takeaways from “Moving the Encryption Policy Conversation Forward”
  • Encryption Working Group
  • September 10, 2019

The International Debate

In May 2019, the Encryption Working Group released a series of briefings detailing the encryption debates in a select number of key countries and regions—Australia, Brazil, China, the European Union, Germany, and India—that were prepared by local and area experts at the request of the Encryption Working Group. They are designed to shine light on key drivers of the debates in these countries, how they have evolved in the last five years, and the divergent approaches taken by different governments. The briefs do not take a position on encryption policy, rather they provide analysis of how debates about encryption have evolved internationally. The views are the authors’ own and do not necessarily reflect the views of Carnegie or the Encryption Working Group.

Australia
  • Stilgherrian
  • May 30, 2019
Brazil
  • Gabriel Aleixo, Andrea Guimaraes Gobbato, Natalia Langennegger, Ronaldo Lemos, Isabela Garcia de Souza, and Fabro Steibel
  • May 30, 2019
China
  • Lorand Laskai and Adam Segal
  • May 30, 2019
The EU
  • Maria Koomen
  • May 30, 2019
Germany
  • Sven Herpig and Stefan Heumann
  • May 30, 2019
India
  • Bedavyasa Mohanty
  • May 30, 2019

Future Trends

In April 2019, the working group released two papers that were prepared by Princeton University’s Center for Information Technology Policy at the request of the Carnegie Encryption Working Group as briefings to provide insight into future trends related to encryption policy. One paper focuses on the impacts of quantum computing and another paper addresses how market trends, consumer behavior, and engineering realities will shape the deployment of user-controlled encryption. The papers do not take a position on encryption policy, rather they provide analysis of the future trends related to encryption and how they will shape the issues that policymakers must address.

Likely Future Adoption of User-Controlled Encryption
  • Princeton University CITP
  • April 26, 2019
Implications of Quantum Computing for Encryption Policy
  • Princeton University CITP
  • April 26, 2019

The Encryption Working Group will continue its efforts to study this important issue and plans on releasing further briefings on aspects of the encryption policy debate around the world in the coming months.

All Publications

    • Paper

    Moving the Encryption Policy Conversation Forward

    • Encryption Working Group
    • September 10, 2019

    Strong data encryption thwarts criminals and preserves privacy. At the same time, it complicates law enforcement investigations. A Carnegie working group looks to move the debate forward.

    • International Encryption Brief

    The Encryption Debate in the European Union

    • Maria Koomen
    • May 30, 2019

    As fears of terrorism intensified, EU member states have demanded a European policy solution to questions around encryption.

    • International Encryption Brief

    The Encryption Debate in Brazil

    • Gabriel Aleixo, Andréa Guimarães Gobbato, Isabela Garcia de Souza, Natalia Langenegger, Ronaldo Lemos, Fabro Steibel
    • May 30, 2019

    In Brazil so far, neither legislation nor judicial decisions have drawn a definitive line on access to encrypted data.

    • International Encryption Brief

    The Encryption Debate in Australia

    • Stilgherrian
    • May 30, 2019

    New laws in Australia are framed as a contribution to the Five Eyes intelligence alliance. Yet the laws are controversial domestically.

    • International Encryption Brief

    The Encryption Debate in China

    • Lorand Laskai, Adam Segal
    • May 30, 2019

    As China has grown into a technological power, its encryption debate has expanded to concerns about the tension between government access and personal information protection.

    • International Encryption Brief

    The Encryption Debate in Germany

    • Sven Herpig, Stefan Heumann
    • May 30, 2019

    Germany takes a clear and unambiguous stance on strong encryption as a fundamental element for the protection of government networks, the economy, and German citizens.

    • International Encryption Brief

    The Encryption Debate in India

    • Bedavyasa Mohanty
    • May 30, 2019

    Regulation on encryption is imminent in India. Its exact nature remains undecided, but it will significantly affect India’s newly recognized fundamental right to privacy.

    • Paper

    Likely Future Adoption of User-Controlled Encryption

    • Princeton University CITP
    • April 26, 2019

    There will almost always be customer demand for user-controlled encryption, but its impact will depend on how widely it is deployed.

    • Paper

    Implications of Quantum Computing for Encryption Policy

    • Princeton University CITP
    • April 26, 2019

    Quantum computers use different underlying mechanisms of physics than normal computers, and their future development could reshape many aspects of computing, including encryption.

Members of the Encryption Working Group include:

  • Jim Baker
    Former General Counsel, Federal Bureau of Investigation
  • Katherine Charlet
    Program Director, Technology and International Affairs, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
  • Tom Donahue
    Visiting Fellow, George Mason National Security Institute, and former Senior Director for Cyber Operations, National Security Council, White House
  • Ed Felten
    Robert E. Kahn Professor of Computer Science and Public Affairs, Princeton University
  • Avril Haines
    Senior Research Scholar at Columbia University’s Columbia World Projects and former Deputy Director, Central Intelligence Agency
  • Susan Hennessey
    Executive Editor, Lawfare, and Senior Fellow in Governance Studies, the Brookings Institution
  • Chris Inglis
    Managing Director, Paladin Capital Group, and former Deputy Director, National Security Agency
  • Sean Joyce
    US Cybersecurity and Privacy Leader, PwC, and former Deputy Director, Federal Bureau of Investigation
  • Susan Landau
    Bridge Professor of Cyber Security and Policy, Tufts University
  • Christy Lopez
    Distinguished Visitor from Practice, Georgetown Law Center
  • Alex Macgillivray
    Board Member, Data & Society, and former Deputy Chief Technology Officer of the United States
  • Jason Matheny
    Founding Director, Georgetown Center for Security and Emerging Technology, and former Director, Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity
  • Tim Maurer
    Co-Director and Fellow, Cyber Policy Initiative, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
  • Denis McDonough
    Visiting Senior Fellow, Technology and International Affairs, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, and former White House Chief of Staff
  • Lisa Monaco
    Distinguished Senior Fellow, Reiss Center on Law and Security, New York University School of Law, and former Assistant to the President for Homeland Security and Counterterrorism
  • Laura Moy
    Executive Director, Center on Privacy & Technology, Georgetown Law Center
  • Michelle Richardson
    Director, Privacy and Data Project, Center for Democracy and Technology
  • Ronald L. Rivest
    Institute Professor, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Ari Schwartz
    Managing Director of Cybersecurity Services, Venable LLP
  • Harlan Yu
    Executive Director, Upturn
  • Denise Zheng
    Senior Associate (Non-resident), Technology Policy Program, Center for Strategic and International Studies

Note: This is not a comprehensive list of all members. Some wish to remain anonymous for the time being and to contribute in their personal capacity.

Please note...

You are leaving the website for the Carnegie-Tsinghua Center for Global Policy and entering a website for another of Carnegie's global centers.

请注意...

你将离开清华—卡内基中心网站,进入卡内基其他全球中心的网站。