United States

    • Commentary

    'Meddling' In Ukraine: Democracy is not an American plot.

    Not all observers of Ukraine's "Orange Revolution" are pleased. Instead of democracy's advance, some see a U.S.-orchestrated conspiracy to undermine Ukrainian sovereignty, weaken Russia's sphere of influence, and expand Washington's imperial reach. However, others point to the combination of a weak, divided, and corrupt regime and a united, mobilized, and highly motivated opposition.

    • Research

    One Year Later in Libya

    One year ago this December 19, Libya announced it was abandoning its nuclear weapon and missile programs after over two decades of trying to build a bomb. Since then, Libya has permitted international officials to inspect 10 previously undisclosed nuclear sites and to remove and destroy all key components of its programs. Libya is a model for how to end a nation’s nuclear weapon program by changing regime behavior rather than by changing the regime.

    • Commentary

    Beating the retreat on democracy

    • Commentary

    Putin Gambles Big--and Loses

    Whoever wins the Ukrainian election, Russian president Vladimir Putin is a clear loser. Putin has suffered a serious setback because of the way he tried to deal with his most important neighbor. Putin's behavior has weakened Russia's influence in strategic Ukraine and damaged the Russian president's reputation in the West.

    • Commentary

    Embraceable EU

    Americans are generally skeptical of or indifferent to the EU. They shouldn't be. The U.S. has an important interest in the direction the EU takes in coming years.

    • Commentary

    Taking Back America

    • Commentary

    Democracy Promotion as a World Value

     

    • Research

    Walking on Eggshells in Tehran

    • George Perkovich
    • November 23, 2004
    • c 2004 Yale Center for the Study of Globalization

    Much of the world breathed a sigh of relief when Iran and three European Union countries recently agreed on a course to resolve the boiling crisis over Iran's nuclear activities. With Iran agreeing to suspend those activities as long as progress is made in structuring a longer-term cooperative relationship with  Europe, the nuclear issue shifted to the backburner. But the relief was cut short by the US claim of new evidence that Iran is violating its commitment not to pursue nuclear weapons.

    • Commentary

    U.S. Strategy: Assisting Pakistan's Transformation

    Ashley J. Tellis explains how the United States can push Pakistan in the direction of democratic reform while maintaining cooperation in the war on terrorism.

    • Research

    Global Implications of the U.S. Election

    U.S. President George Bush has won reelection. He is the first President to receive more than 50 percent of the votes cast since 1988 and got more votes than anyone President in American history. In addition, his Republican Party has increased its majority in both houses of the US Congress, giving the President an even more comfortable base of support in Washington. Overall, President Bush can claim a mandate from the American people, and it is reasonable for him and his advisors to view the vote as an endorsement on their policies and priorities. This will have serious and possibly profound implications for US policy and for many other countries, particularly key US allies in East Asia, Europe, and the Middle East. The end result may be to project the split nature of American politics onto the rest of the world, forcing countries to choose between the United States or alternative approaches to their security.

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