Jordan

All

    • Policy Outlook

    The Key to Arab Reform: Moderate Islamists

    For decades, Arab regimes have used scare tactics to encourage the United States and Europe to support their repressive measures toward Islamist movements by invoking the image of anti-Western fanatics taking power through the ballot box. However, today’s moderate Islamists no longer match this nightmare.

    • Op-Ed

    The West and Moderate Islam

    In the last few years, Arab liberals have been gradually reaching out to moderate Islamists and engaging them in campaigns calling for reforms. These are steps in the right direction and the U.S. and Europe should learn from this example. The cause of political transformation in the region is best served by bringing in Islamist movements and their popular constituencies.

    • Book

    Islam and Democracy in the Middle East

    • Larry Diamond, Daniel Brumberg, Marc F. Plattner, Editors
    • September 30, 2003
    • Johns Hopkins University Press, September 2003

    Drawing on the insights of some twenty-five leading Western and Middle Eastern scholars, Islam and Democracy in the Middle East highlights the dualistic and often contradictory nature of political liberalization. Political liberalization—as managed by the state—not only opens new spaces for debate and criticism, but is also used as a deliberate tactic to avoid genuine democratization.

    • Op-Ed

    The Middle East's Muffled Signals

    Despite predictions that the American march into Baghdad would unleash either a wave of democratization or a plague of repression throughout the region, in reality most Middle Eastern states are too preoccupied with domestic problems to be moved profoundly by events in Iraq. Iraq will have a political impact on the region, but changes are likely to come in smaller steps than commonly predicted.

    • Paper

    Liberalization Versus Democracy: Understanding Arab Political Reform

    Before the United States can determine whether its gradualist approach to democratic reform in the Middle East is the best remedy, we must first understand how Arab autocracies actually work. In particular, we must understand how the "liberalized autocracies" of the region endure despite frequent prediction of their imminent death.

    • Op-Ed

    Coalition of the Unwilling

    It is important to have partners in the war on terrorism, Carnegie's Robert Kagan writes, but a unilateral determination to act invariably precedes a policy of effective multilateralism.

Related Carnegie Experts

  • expert thumbnail - Dunne
    Michele Dunne
    Director and Senior Fellow
    Middle East Program
    Michele Dunne is the director and a senior fellow in Carnegie’s Middle East Program, where her research focuses on political and economic change in Arab countries, particularly Egypt, as well as U.S. policy in the Middle East.
  • expert thumbnail - Levite
    Ariel (Eli) Levite
    Nonresident Senior Fellow
    Nuclear Policy Program
    Cyber Policy Initiative
    Levite was the principal deputy director general for policy at the Israeli Atomic Energy Commission from 2002 to 2007.
  • expert thumbnail - Miller
    Andrew Miller
    Nonresident Scholar
    Middle East Program
    Andrew Miller is a nonresident scholar in Carnegie’s Middle East Program.
  • expert thumbnail - Muasher
    Marwan Muasher
    Vice President for Studies
    Muasher is vice president for studies at Carnegie, where he oversees research in Washington and Beirut on the Middle East.
  • expert thumbnail - Sayigh
    Yezid Sayigh
    Senior Fellow
    Malcolm H. Kerr Carnegie Middle East Center
    Yezid Sayigh is a senior fellow at the Malcolm H. Kerr Carnegie Middle East Center in Beirut, where he leads the program on Civil-Military Relations in Arab States (CMRAS). His work focuses on the comparative political and economic roles of Arab armed forces and nonstate actors, the impact of war on states and societies, and the politics of postconflict reconstruction and security sector transformation in Arab transitions, and authoritarian resurgence.
  • expert thumbnail - Walles
    Jake Walles
    Nonresident Senior Fellow
    Middle East Program
    Jake Walles is a nonresident senior fellow in the Middle East Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, where he focuses on Israeli-Palestinian issues, Tunisia, and counterterrorism.

Sign up for
Carnegie Email

Please note...

You are leaving the website for the Carnegie-Tsinghua Center for Global Policy and entering a website for another of Carnegie's global centers.

请注意...

你将离开清华—卡内基中心网站,进入卡内基其他全球中心的网站。