China

    • Commentary

    How China Will Take Taiwan

    China's White Paper on Taiwan and Jiang Zemin’s desire to make reunification his legacy indicate that Taiwan will be attacked soon. A massive, coordinated air strike using short-range ballistic missiles could cripple Taiwan's air defenses and early warning systems, neutralizing its air force as well as naval ports. The U.S. military has no capabilities for defending Taiwan in such a scenario.

    • Research

    Politics of the Economic Crisis in Asia: Consensus and Controversies

    • March 01, 2000
    • Washington, DC: Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, 2000

    • Commentary

    Clinton's China Two-Step

    • Research

    Interpreting China's Grand Strategy

    The book reveals why managing the rise of China constitutes one of the most important challenges facing the United States in the early 21st century.

    • Research

    Rapprochement or Rivalry? Russia-China Relations in a Changing Asia

    U.S., Russian, and Chinese scholars analyze the most important issues posed by the relationship between China and Russia, and weigh the prospects for real cooperation between Russia, a severely weakened power, and China, a power on the rise.

    • Commentary

    Distinctly American Internationalism

    George W. Bush's November 19 speech at the Reagan Library represents the strongest and clearest articulation of a policy of American global leadership by a major political figure since the collapse of the Soviet Empire. In his call for renewed American strength, confidence, and leadership, Bush stakes a claim to the legacy of Ronald Reagan.

    • Commentary

    Present Danger

    Last week, while many China experts inside and outside the Clinton administration were confidently predicting that China would not escalate the conflict with Taiwan, others warned that Beijing might well be contemplating an attack. This turned out to be correct.

    • Commentary

    Peace Through Strength

    Last week, the Chinese navy seized a Taiwanese freighter carrying provisions to Taiwanese soldiers stationed on the tiny Taiwanese island of Matsu a few miles off the coast of the Chinese mainland. The current Chinese military activities may not be mere gestures designed to intimidate Taiwan and the U.S. They may well be the opening phase of a serious military confrontation.

    • Commentary

    Pressuring Taiwan, Appeasing Beijing

    The official U.S. posture of prostration before Beijing -- the China hands call it "engagement" -- would be merely pitiful, perhaps even amusing, were it not so dangerous. But the Clinton administration is now applying its strategy of appeasement to the brewing crisis over Taiwan, and the result may be to hasten the military conflict the administration is trying to avoid.

    • Commentary

    Free Taiwan

    Taiwan's President Li Teng-hui sent the American foreign policy establishment into a nervous frenzy last week when he declared that Taiwan would henceforth negotiate with China as one state to another. By carefully stripping away the absurd fictions of the "one-China" policy, President Li is actually doing all concerned a big favor.

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