The recent violent protests in Kyiv during parliamentary debates about constitutional changes and autonomy for eastern Ukraine underscore the country’s daunting domestic challenges. The Carnegie Endowment for International Peace is launching a new initiative to monitor Ukraine’s reform process on an ongoing basis. Carnegie has assembled an independent team of Ukrainian scholars based in Kyiv and other parts of Ukraine to produce regular reform updates. The purpose of this undertaking is to provide an objective, rigorous assessment of the wide-ranging reforms being advanced by the Ukrainian government.

Carnegie hosted the launch of the Ukraine Reform Monitor in a discussion with Balázs Jarábik, a visiting scholar at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and co-manager of the Ukraine Reform Monitor, and David Herszenhorn of the New York Times who has covered the crisis in Ukraine.  They discussed the progress of domestic reforms in Ukraine, the key challenges facing the Poroshenko government, and the situation in eastern Ukraine.

David M. Herszenhorn

David M. Herszenhorn recently completed an assignment as a Moscow-based correspondent for the New York Times. He covered the crisis in Ukraine from the very beginning of the protests on the Maidan in November 2013.

Balázs Jarábik

Balázs Jarábik is a visiting scholar at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and co-manager of the Ukraine Reform Monitor. He currently serves as a project director for Pact, Inc., based in Vilnius, Lithuania.

Eugene Rumer

Eugene Rumer is a senior associate and the director of Carnegie’s Russia and Eurasia Program.