Andrew Yang, secretary general of the Chinese Council of Advanced Policy Studies, discussed the changes that have occurred in cross-Strait relations since the Taiwan Strait crisis. He argued that ten years after the 1996 missile crisis, the security situation in the Taiwan Strait remains unstable and tension could easily escalate into military confrontation should there be miscalculation or misinterpretation of existing political trends on either side of the Strait, or regarding the posture of the United States.  Mainland China and Taiwan must co-develop a mutually acceptable peace and stability framework to manage the security situation in the Taiwan Strait. Carnegie's Michael Swaine moderated the event.

Since 1991, Andrew Yang has served as secretary general of the Chinese Council of Advanced Policy Studies, which analyzes the strategic and security aspects of China’s domestic and international situation.  He has worked as a lecturer and research associate with the Sun Yat-sen Center for Policy Studies at National Sun Yat-sen University in Kaohsiung since 1986, and has been Coordinator for the Center's Asia Pacific Research Group since 1996. He is also an advisor to Taiwan’s Ministries of Foreign Affairs and National Defense. His publications analyze political and military strategies in Asia, especially in the area of cross-Strait relations.