Joseph Bahout

Visiting Scholar
Middle East Program
tel +1 202 751 0547
Joseph Bahout is a visiting scholar in Carnegie’s Middle East Program. His research focuses on political developments in Lebanon and Syria, regional spillover from the Syrian crisis, and identity politics across the region.
 

Education

BA, Economics, American University of Beirut
Diploma, International Relations, Sciences Po Paris
PhD, Political Science, Sciences Po Paris

 

Languages

Arabic; English; French

 

Joseph Bahout is a visiting scholar in Carnegie’s Middle East Program. His research focuses on political developments in Lebanon and Syria, regional spillover from the Syrian crisis, and identity politics across the region.

Previously, Bahout served as a permanent consultant for the Policy Planning Unit at the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs (2009–2014). He was a professor of Middle Eastern Studies at Sciences Po Paris (2005–2014) and a senior fellow at Académie Diplomatique Internationale (2008–2014). He also served as a professor of political sociology and international relations at Université Saint-Joseph in Lebanon (1993–2004), and a researcher at the Beirut-based Centre d’Etudes et de Recherches sur le Moyen-Orient Contemporain (1993–2000). 
 
Bahout is currently an associate fellow at the Geneva Center for Security Policy, and a member of the scientific board of the Institut Français du Proche-Orient. 

He is the author of books on Syria’s business community and its political outlook (1994), and Lebanon’s political reconstruction (1998), in addition to numerous articles and book chapters. He is a frequent commentator in European and Arab media.

  • November 19, 2015
    Online Q&A on the Middle East and North Africa

    Several Middle East scholars participated in an online Q&A to discuss current trends in the Middle East and North Africa.

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  • November 10, 2015 Washington, DC
    The Economics of the Arab Spring and Its Aftermath

    The Arab uprisings in Tunisia, Egypt, Yemen, Libya, and Syria over the past five years represent a conundrum. Standard development indicators failed to capture or predict the outburst of popular anger during the so-called Arab Spring of 2011.

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  • November 3, 2014 Washington, DC
    From Hizbullah to the Islamic State

    From humble beginnings in the 1980s, Hizbullah’s political clout and public perception have trended upward, thanks to a communications strategy that has adapted to changes in the local and regional environment.

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  • October 29, 2014 Washington, DC
    The Islamic State, Iraq, and the Levant: Support and Nation-Building in Weak States

    This panel considered the political, security, and humanitarian situation in Iraq, Syria, and Lebanon and the threat posed by the rise of Salafist jihadist groups including the Islamic State, Al Nusra, and other groups.

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Source: http://carnegieendowment.org/experts/index.cfm?fa=expert_view&expert_id=1008
 
Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
 
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