Diane de Gramont

Nonresident Research Analyst
Democracy and Rule of Law Program
Diane de Gramont is a nonresident research analyst in Carnegie’s Democracy and Rule of Law Program.
 

Education

AB, Harvard College
MPhil, University of Oxford

Languages

English; French; Spanish

 

Diane de Gramont is a nonresident research analyst in Carnegie’s Democracy and Rule of Law Program. Her research specialties include international support for democracy and governance, the use of political analysis in development assistance, and the politics of governance reform. She holds an MPhil in Politics: Comparative Government from the University of Oxford and is currently a J.D. candidate at Yale Law School. She is the co-author (with Thomas Carothers) of Development Aid Confronts Politics: The Almost Revolution (Carnegie, 2013).

  • Paper November 4, 2014
    Beyond Magic Bullets in Governance Reform

    A close examination of governance successes in the developing world indicates that effective advocacy must move beyond a search for single-focus “magic bullet” solutions toward an integrated approach that recognizes multiple interrelated drivers of governance change.

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  • Op-Ed DAI Global Developments August 21, 2013
    Rethinking Participatory Development: From Critique to Better Practice

    Participatory aid needs to move away from a model of participatory projects as standalone endeavors toward building linkages with domestic institutions and directly supporting citizen empowerment.

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  • Op-Ed Oxfam From Poverty to Power June 17, 2013
    Politically Smart Aid? Of Course! Political Aid? Not So Sure!

    Within the aid community, there are sharply divergent views on how political development assistance is and how political it should be.

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  • Op-Ed Foreign Policy May 21, 2013
    The Prickly Politics of Aid

    Development aid is inherently political, but that’s not necessarily a bad thing.

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  • Op-Ed Guardian May 9, 2013
    Development Aid Confronts Politics

    Developmental change is an inherently political process and development aid must necessarily be politically informed and politically engaged to be successful.

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  • Aiding Governance in Developing Countries: Progres
    Paper November 29, 2011
    Aiding Governance in Developing Countries: Progress Amid Uncertainties

    International aid donors have learned important lessons about how to provide effective governance assistance to developing countries, but turning these insights into practice remains a major challenge.

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  • Peru’s Presidential Elections: Democracy in Danger
    Q&A May 31, 2011
    Peru’s Presidential Elections: Democracy in Danger?

    As Peruvians head to the polls on June 5, their democracy faces a major test. Both presidential candidates have weak democratic credentials and reflect the continued shortcomings of Peru's widely lauded political and economic model.

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  • Carnegie Endowment for International Peace April 16, 2013
    Development Aid Confronts Politics: The Almost Revolution

    The overdue recognition that development in all sectors is an inherently political process is driving international aid providers to try to learn how to think and act politically.

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Source: http://carnegieendowment.org/experts/index.cfm?fa=expert_view&expert_id=554
 
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