Iskander Rehman

Associate
Nuclear Policy Program
Rehman was an associate in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment and a Stanton Nuclear Security Fellow. His research focuses on security and crisis stability in Asia, specifically the geopolitical ramifications of naval nuclearization in the Indian Ocean.
 

Education

MS, Political Science, Sciences Po, Paris
MRes, Comparative Politics, Sciences Po, Paris
BA, Political Science, Sciences Po, Paris 

Languages

English; French

 

Iskander Rehman is no longer with the Carnegie Endowment.

Iskander Rehman was an associate in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment and a Stanton Nuclear Security Fellow. His research focuses on security and crisis stability in Asia, specifically the geopolitical ramifications of naval nuclearization in the Indian Ocean.

Prior to joining Carnegie, Rehman held fellowships at the Transatlantic Academy in Washington, DC, as well as at the Institute for Defense Studies and Analyses and the Observer Research Foundation, both in New Delhi. He received a two-year grant for his work on South Asian naval dynamics from the French Ministry of Defense in 2008.

His work on issues ranging from Sino-Indian rivalry in Asia to Australia’s potential future role in Air-Sea Battle has been published in peer-reviewed journals including Asian Security and the Naval War College Review as well as in various think tank policy papers. His research has been featured in the Economist, the Financial Times, and the Guardian. From 2008 to 2011, he was a regular contributor to BBC World Service, specializing in Asian territorial disputes.

He is currently completing his doctorate in comparative politics at Sciences Po, Paris.

  • Other Publications Brookings Institution June 13, 2013
    From an Ocean of Peace to a Sea of Friends

    Although New Delhi has long recognized the importance of the Indian Ocean, it has only recently begun to display the underpinnings of a true maritime geostrategy.

  •  
  • Op-Ed Diplomat May 31, 2013
    Shallow Nations, Deep Waters

    For relatively small coastal states such as Pakistan and Israel, the quest for maritime depth has given birth to naval nuclear force structures with the potential to undermine stability during a crisis.

  •  
  • Op-Ed BBC Vietnam March 9, 2013
    Dragon in a Bathtub: Chinese Nuclear Submarines and the South China Sea

    Despite Washington's efforts to construct stronger ties with China, relations between the two countries have been repeatedly buffeted by a series of tensions and misunderstandings.

  •  
  • Op-Ed National Interest March 7, 2013
    Arc of Crisis 2.0?

    One of the defining geopolitical narratives of this past half-decade has been the emergence of the Indo-Pacific as the maritime epicenter of global activity. In reality, however, the sudden recognition of the Indian Ocean’s centrality is anything but a new phenomenon.

  •  
  • Other Publications European Geostrategy November 6, 2012
    The Chinese Navy's Hidden European Past: How the Study of European History is Key to Understanding China's Naval Rise

    European history is replete with moments which can offer insight into some of the more complex-and potentially disquieting-facets of China's emergence as a major geopolitical actor.

  •  
  • Other Publications Excerpt from The Rise of the Indian Navy October 15, 2012
    India's Aspirational Naval Doctrine

    The Indian Navy has had to grapple for years with receiving only a meager portion of the nation's defense budget.

  •  
  • Other Publications Naval War College Review August 21, 2012
    Drowning Stability: The Perils of Naval Nuclearization and Brinkmanship in the Indian Ocean

    Since 1998, the evolution of nuclear postures and arsenals in both New Delhi and Islamabad no longer appears to evoke the same degree of international concern, or even interest.

  •  
Source: http://carnegieendowment.org/experts/index.cfm?fa=expert_view&expert_id=746

Areas of Expertise

 
Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
 
1779 Massachusetts Avenue NW Washington, DC 20036-2103 Phone: 202 483 7600 Fax: 202 483 1840
Please note...

You are leaving the website for the Carnegie-Tsinghua Center for Global Policy and entering a website for another of Carnegie's global centers.

请注意...

你将离开清华—卡内基中心网站,进入卡内基其他全球中心的网站。