Yukon Huang

Senior Associate
Asia Program
Huang is a senior associate in the Carnegie Asia Program, where his research focuses on China’s economic development and its impact on Asia and the global economy.
 

Education

PhD, MA, Princeton University 
BA, Yale University

Languages

Chinese; English

 

Yukon Huang is a senior associate in the Carnegie Asia Program, where his research focuses on China’s economic development and its impact on Asia and the global economy.

Previously, he was the World Bank’s country director for China (1997–2004) and for Russia and the former Soviet Union Republics of Central Asia (1992–1997). Before that, he served as lead economist for Asia and chief for Country Assistance Strategies. He has also held positions at the U.S. Treasury and various universities in the United States, Tanzania, and Malaysia.

He is the A-List commentator for the Financial Times on China, and his articles also appear frequently in other major media such as the Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg, Foreign Affairs, and CNN. 

Huang has published widely on development issues, recently co-editing the book East Asia Visions, a collection of papers by noted Asian scholars on future prospects for the region. He recently completed a volume entitled Reshaping Economic Geography in East Asia.

He is an adviser to the World Bank and the Asian Development Bank, as well as to various governments and companies. 

  • Op-Ed Wall Street Journal April 8, 2014
    The Debt Surge Will Not Ruin China

    China will see a rise in banks’ nonperforming loans and increasingly frequent defaults in the bond and shadow banking markets. This process will be very messy but is unlikely to derail the economy.

  •  
  • Op-Ed Financial Times March 31, 2014
    Let China’s Cities Flourish Free From Central Control

    Instead of trying to disperse growth to the smaller cities, China’s planners should embrace the market forces that encourage its mega-cities to grow still larger.

  •  
  • Op-Ed Financial Times March 20, 2014
    Let Us Not Miss the Point on Chinese Defaults

    The decision not to bail Chaori out is not a true test of Beijing’s commitment to allow the “market to play a decisive role” in resource allocation as announced last year in the third plenum.

  •  
  • Op-Ed Wall Street Journal March 13, 2014
    The Wrong Way to Liberalize China’s Rates

    Liberalizing deposit interest rates without first addressing other distortions within the financial system will exacerbate distortions and introduce new and unnecessary risks to China’s economy.

  •  
  • Op-Ed Financial Times February 11, 2014 中文
    Do Not Fear a Chinese Property Bubble

    Much of China’s explosive debt growth has been driven by the development of a private land market over the past decade, making the surge in debt a sign of financial deepening rather than instability.

  •  
  • Op-Ed Financial Times January 7, 2014 中文
    China’s Interest Rates Are Too High, Not Too Low

    Arguing that China’s deposit interest rate is too low leads to a misplaced emphasis on liberalizing interest rates: the real priorities are capital deepening and regulatory reform.

  •  
  • Op-Ed National Interest January 7, 2014 中文
    China’s Burgeoning Graduates: Too Much of a Good Thing?

    China’s glut of college graduates may help it become competitive with developed countries in high-skill services and manufacturing, thus helping China escape the middle-income trap.

  •  
  • Op-Ed Financial Times December 13, 2013
    China's Brightened Prospects

    The third plenum reform proposals will take time to enact but, if rigorously implemented, they will enable China to continue growing at 8 or more percent while also improving the quality of growth.

  •  
  • Op-Ed Financial Times November 14, 2013 中文
    How to Make “Comprehensively Deepening Reform” in China

    China’s future lies as much in maintaining political stability as in sustaining rapid growth.

  •  
  • Op-Ed Wall Street Journal October 22, 2013 中文
    China’s Banks Must Compete to Survive

    The standard package of market-based financial reforms will not work until China’s banks are subjected to increased competition.

  •  
  • China View December 31, 2013
    Solving China’s Swelling Local Debt Problem

    Addressing China’s local debt problem requires fiscal reforms to increase local revenues. Sustaining growth also requires expanding the role of private firms and a more efficient urbanization process.

  •  
  • China View December 27, 2013
    Balancing China’s Economy is Unnecessary

    All successful development stories, from the United States to Korea, involved the same unbalanced growth trajectory China is now on, and they only rebalanced once they reached high income.

  •  
  • CCTV July 16, 2013
    Policymakers Not Concerned Over Chinese Growth Rate

    Chinese leaders are less concerned about growth moderating in the short term and are more focused on long-term reforms.

  •  
  • Channel News Asia July 9, 2013
    Developing Countries Take the Lead in Trade Liberalization

    China is giving more consideration to the possibility of joining the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

  •  
  • CNBC's Squawk Box November 13, 2012
    The Role of SOEs in China's Future

    Vested interests have capped the growth of the private sector in China. The Chinese government needs to promote greater competition between the state-owned enterprise sector and the private sector.

  •  
  • BBC World News November 8, 2012
    Corruption and Reform in China

    Pervasive corruption is causing increasing unrest in China, and while political transition has sparked hopes for reforms, vested interests pose a daunting challenging.

  •  
  • BBC News April 30, 2012
    Chen Guangcheng: Both Countries Want 'Quick Resolution'

    Both the United States and China want to resolve the tension caused by the escape of Chen Guangcheng before high-level U.S. officials are scheduled to arrive in Beijing.

  •  
  • BBC News March 13, 2012
    Row Over Rare Earth Metals

    Rare earth metals are vital ingredients in a wide range of high tech product lines important to global trade and China's perceived monopoly on these metals is a big concern for the West.

  •  
  • CSPAN's Washington Journal August 19, 2011
    China's Economic Growth: Challenges and Opportunities for the United States

    The United States must generate more high-value jobs to capitalize on the opportunities presented by a rising China, which is likely to continue to make sustaining double-digit growth a key priority.

  •  
  • Yukon Huang
    PBS NewsHour January 20, 2011
    As China's Economy Grows, How Hard Should U.S. Push on Currency, Human Rights?

    While China's trade imbalance and currency valuation are in a process of gradual rebalancing, the central question now facing China's economy is how to begin producing higher technology exports.

  •  
  • January 28, 2014 Washington, DC 中文
    China’s Growth Prospects After the Third Plenum

    It remains to be seen whether the third plenum decisions can put China on a sustainable and robust growth path.

  •  
  • November 7, 2013 Washington, DC 中文
    China’s Economy in Transition

    Much has been made of China’s recent internal and external rebalancing.

  •  
  • July 16, 2013 Washington, DC 中文
    China’s New Growth Model: Myths and Realities

    Lessons from other successful developing countries suggest that China’s path to growth may involve continued imbalances and require policy reforms that are often misunderstood.

  •  
  • November 30, 2012 Washington, D.C. 中文
    Russia and China in the Global Economy

    Russia and China are facing new challenges as they engage the new globalized marketplace. What can they learn from each other as they try to increase human capital and develop knowledge-based economies?

  •  
  • September 27, 2012 Washington, D.C. 中文
    China’s Economic Slowdown and its Policy Implications

    There is increasing concern that China’s economic slowdown is intensifying. However it turns out, this slowdown is occurring at a particularly inopportune time for China—just as the next generation of leaders is being anointed.

  •  
  • March 21, 2012 Washington, D.C.
    Assessing the National People's Congress

    The Fifth Session of the Eleventh National People’s Congress (NPC) has added significance given the impending anointment of China's next generation of senior leaders at this fall's National Congress of the Communist Party.

  •  
  • February 13, 2012 Beijing 中文
    The China Conundrum

    No country generates as many different economic forecasts and interpretations than China. Some analysts claim that China is an unstoppable economic power, while others warn that China’s economic growth is unstable, unbalanced, and unsustainable.

  •  
  • December 21, 2011 Washington, D.C. 中文
    Global Economic Outlook: China, the Euro Crisis, and the United States

    The global economic outlook for 2012 and 2013 is exceptionally uncertain. With the euro crisis continuing to fester, a global credit crunch, and generalized slowdown threatening emerging markets, it remains unclear where growth will come from.

  •  
  • October 13, 2011 Beijing 中文
    Future of China’s Economic Rise is Unpredictable

    China’s economy— more importantly, its domestic consumption— is not as unbalanced as it first appears and is a result of the broader direction of the country’s economy.

  •  
  • Engineering China’s Financial Reform
    September 16, 2011 Washington, D.C. 中文
    Engineering China’s Financial Reform

    While China remains an engine of growth in an unsettled global economy, it also faces many challenges, including high inflation, the potential of a housing market bubble, and volatile global liquidity conditions.

  •  
Source: http://carnegieendowment.org/experts/index.cfm?fa=expert_view&expert_id=533

Areas of Expertise

 
Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
 
1779 Massachusetts Avenue NW Washington, DC 20036-2103 Phone: 202 483 7600 Fax: 202 483 1840
Please note...

You are leaving the website for the Carnegie-Tsinghua Center for Global Policy and entering a website for another of Carnegie's global centers.

请注意...

你将离开清华—卡内基中心网站,进入卡内基其他全球中心的网站。