Afghanistan

 
  • Eurasia Outlook
    From Fergana Valley to Syria—the Transformation of Central Asian Radical Islam
    Bayram Balci July 25, 2014

    The radical jihadi group known as the Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan (IMU) emerged after the collapse of the Soviet Union. A little bit more than twenty years after it first appeared, this on-going transformation has made it less connected to Uzbekistan, and more to a global jihad.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    In Time of Sharp Tensions, Islamist Extremism Continues to Unite Russia and the United States
    Alexei Arbatov July 15, 2014

    The problems arising across the globe from militant radical Islam cannot be dealt with at a later date. Russia and the West have vital mutual interests, since they share this common enemy. Given the extent of its involvement, Russia should take the initiative.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    From Fallujah to Kandahar? Avoiding an Iraqi Mistake in Afghanistan
    David Kelm July 11, 2014

    Some say the chaos in western Iraq is foreshadowing of what awaits post-2014 Afghanistan. But Kabul knows its vulnerabilities and will not shun outside help.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    The World Grew Tired of Afghanistan But Wishes It Well
    Arkady Dubnov June 24, 2014

    The world treats Afghanistan as a doctor would treat a seriously ill child that nevertheless shows some signs of improvement. If Moscow sincerely wants Afghanistan to return to peace and stability, then it should stop looking at this country through the prism of its present relations with Washington.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    Uzbek Terrorism: Myth or Reality?
    Arkady Dubnov June 11, 2014

    Although participation of Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan in the recent attacks on a Karachi airport is not confirmed yet, many analysts believe the IMU to be a real force that threatens the countries in the region.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    Afghanistan Presidential Election At Half-Time
    Alexey Malashenko May 1, 2014

    The Afghan presidential elections did take place. The traditional and arch-conservative Afghan society is gradually getting used to regular democratic political instruments, although the situation in Afghanistan remains unpredictable, and the national consensus is far out of reach.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    War With Multiple Enemies in Afghanistan
    Petr Topychkanov February 21, 2014

    Today, many countries have to fight against terrorist organizations, which have roots in the Soviet war in Afghanistan. However, this lesson is still unlearned: in Syria, fighters under Islamic flags have gained support of several countries, but this support will recoil upon the supporters’ own heads.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    Afghanistan, 25 Years After
    Dmitri Trenin February 17, 2014

    Twenty-five years after the Soviet pullout from Afghanistan, the Russians watch the U.S.-led coalition withdraws from this country and worry about regional stability, security, and drugs production and trade. To deal effectively with these concerns, Russia should focus not so much on Afghanistan as on its Central Asian neighbors.

     
  • Strategic Europe
    Russia Takes Center Stage at the Munich Security Conference
    Judy Dempsey February 1, 2014

    The ongoing turmoil in Ukraine is shifting European and American attitudes toward Moscow. The West is perceiving the Ukrainian crisis through the prism of Russia.

     
  • Strategic Europe
    The Miserable State of European Defense
    Judy Dempsey February 1, 2014

    Germany’s defense minister has called for greater European defense capabilities—a laudable ambition, but the reality is persistently low defense spending across Europe.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    From Fergana Valley to Syria—the Transformation of Central Asian Radical Islam
    Bayram Balci July 25, 2014

    The radical jihadi group known as the Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan (IMU) emerged after the collapse of the Soviet Union. A little bit more than twenty years after it first appeared, this on-going transformation has made it less connected to Uzbekistan, and more to a global jihad.

     
  • Event
    Tariq Fatemi on Pakistan’s Vision for Regional Peace, Prosperity, and Economic Development
    Frederic Grare, Tariq Fatemi July 21, 2014 Washington, DC

    South Asia’s future remains clouded with uncertainty. The upcoming U.S. exit from Afghanistan, the radicalization across the region, and persisting political rivalries continue to impede regional growth and economic integration.

     
  • Event
    The Resurgence of the Taliban
    Hassan Abbas, Frederic Grare July 16, 2014 Washington, DC

    In autumn 2001, U.S. and NATO troops were deployed to Afghanistan to unseat the Taliban rulers. Yet, despite a more than decade-long attempt to eradicate them, the Taliban has endured—regrouping and reestablishing themselves as a significant insurgent movement.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    In Time of Sharp Tensions, Islamist Extremism Continues to Unite Russia and the United States
    Alexei Arbatov July 15, 2014

    The problems arising across the globe from militant radical Islam cannot be dealt with at a later date. Russia and the West have vital mutual interests, since they share this common enemy. Given the extent of its involvement, Russia should take the initiative.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    From Fallujah to Kandahar? Avoiding an Iraqi Mistake in Afghanistan
    David Kelm July 11, 2014

    Some say the chaos in western Iraq is foreshadowing of what awaits post-2014 Afghanistan. But Kabul knows its vulnerabilities and will not shun outside help.

     
  • Event
    Bangladesh-India Relations Under Modi
    Frederic Grare, Farooq Sobhan June 30, 2014 Washington, DC

    Narendra Modi’s accession as India’s new prime minister raises questions about the future of India-Bangladesh relations. Modi’s predecessor enjoyed a strong relationship with Dhaka, although he did not conclude key agreements on border demarcation and water sharing.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    The World Grew Tired of Afghanistan But Wishes It Well
    Arkady Dubnov June 24, 2014

    The world treats Afghanistan as a doctor would treat a seriously ill child that nevertheless shows some signs of improvement. If Moscow sincerely wants Afghanistan to return to peace and stability, then it should stop looking at this country through the prism of its present relations with Washington.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Pakistani Politics and the Afghan Peace Process
    Frederic Grare June 18, 2014 Tony Blair Faith Foundation

    Over the past few years Pakistan has been trying to signal that its foreign policy has changed, yet Pakistan’s strategic objectives in Afghanistan remain largely the same.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Obama’s Dangerous New Terror War
    Sarah Chayes, Frederic Wehrey June 18, 2014 Politico Magazine

    It’s important to understand the limits of U.S. assistance: It can help build security institutions, but it cannot shape how those institutions are commandeered for personal, political, or communal aims.

     
  • Op-Ed
    2016, the Kabul Story
    Frederic Grare June 13, 2014 Indian Express

    The potential fallout of the relatively rapid departure of American forces by 2015 does not bode well for Afghanistan’s future, and could exacerbate India-Pakistan rivalries in Afghanistan.

     

Carnegie Experts on Afghanistan

  • Sarah Chayes
    Senior Associate
    Democracy and Rule of Law Program
    South Asia Program

    Chayes, formerly special adviser to the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, is an expert in South Asia policy, kleptocracy and anticorruption, and civil-military relations.

  •  
  • Gilles Dorronsoro
    Nonresident Scholar
    South Asia Program

    Dorronsoro’s research focuses on security and political development in Afghanistan. He was a professor of political science at the Sorbonne in Paris and the Institute of Political Studies of Rennes.

  •  
  • Frederic Grare
    Director and Senior Associate
    South Asia Program

    Grare is senior associate and director of Carnegie’s South Asia Program. His research focuses on security issues and democratization in India, Afghanistan, and Pakistan. Previously, he led the Asia bureau at the Directorate for Strategic Affairs in the French Ministry of Defense.

  •  
  • Oz Hassan
    Visiting Scholar
    Democracy and Rule of Law Program

    Hassan is one of the United Kingdom’s foremost authorities on democracy promotion and democracy assistance programs and a leading scholar on U.S. foreign policy.

  •  
  • Jessica Tuchman Mathews
    President

    Mathews is president of the Carnegie Endowment. Before her appointment in 1997, her career included posts in both the executive and legislative branches of government, in management and research in the nonprofit arena, and in journalism and science policy.

  •  
  • C. Raja Mohan
    Nonresident Senior Associate
    South Asia Program

    Mohan is a nonresident senior associate in Carnegie’s South Asia Program, where his research focuses on international security, defense, and Asian strategic issues.

  •  
  • George Perkovich
    Vice President for Studies

    Perkovich’s research focuses on nuclear strategy and nonproliferation, with a concentration on South Asia, Iran, and the problem of justice in the international political economy.

  •  
  • Tamanna Salikuddin
    Nonresident Scholar
    South Asia Program

    Salikuddin was director for Afghanistan and Pakistan at the U.S. National Security Council from 2011 to 2013.

  •  
  • Paul Schulte
    Nonresident Senior Associate
    Nuclear Policy Program and Carnegie Europe

    Schulte is a nonresident senior associate in the Carnegie Nuclear Policy Program and at Carnegie Europe, where his research focuses on the future of deterrence, nuclear strategy, nuclear nonproliferation, cybersecurity, and their political implications.

  •  
  • Stephen Tankel
    Nonresident Scholar
    South Asia Program

    Tankel is a nonresident scholar at the Carnegie Endowment, where his research focuses on insurgency, terrorism, and the evolution of nonstate armed groups.

  •  
  • Ashley J. Tellis
    Senior Associate
    South Asia Program

    Tellis is a senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace specializing in international security, defense, and Asian strategic issues.

  •  
  • Petr Topychkanov
    Associate
    Nonproliferation Program
    Moscow Center

    Topychkanov is an associate in the Carnegie Moscow Center’s Nonproliferation Program.

  •  

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