August 8, 2007

William Chandler, a leading expert on energy and climate, is to join the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, it was announced today. Working as a senior associate out of the Endowment’s office in Washington, D.C., Mr. Chandler will direct its work in these fields and will work closely with projects based in Carnegie’s offices in Moscow, Beijing, Brussels, and Beirut as well.


Making the announcement, Carnegie Endowment President Jessica T. Mathews said:

“Over three decades of work on energy and climate, Bill Chandler’s list of accomplishments is inspiring. He has a unique mix of scholarly expertise, policy experience, and practical knowledge. There is simply no one as well equipped to lead Carnegie’s work on these critically important issues, and I am delighted and very proud that he will be joining the Endowment.

“Bill’s career combines top-tier policy analysis on energy and climate—including authoring or co-authoring 10 books—with an unparalleled record of international institution building. He led the creation of independent, not-for-profit energy efficiency centers in six nations, including Russia and China, has helped arrange the financing of $1 billion in technology transfer projects in Russia, Ukraine, and China, and led several collaborations of international scientists in policy studies for the United Nations, the U.S. government, and U.S. private foundations. He has served as a member of the international energy panel of the U.S. President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology, and been a lead author for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.”

William Chandler said:

“Carnegie is peerless as a global think tank. The Endowment takes on the tough international issues and gets them right. I am honored to have the chance to contribute to Carnegie’s essential work.”

Notes to Press:
  1. William Chandler has worked for 35 years in energy and environmental policy, and is founder and former director of Advanced International Studies, senior staff scientist and laboratory fellow at the Joint Global Change Research Institute (Battelle, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory). He is also president of Transition Energy and co-founder of DEED China, private companies with energy efficiency projects in China.

  2. Chandler has authored or co-authored 10 books, which have been translated into several foreign languages. His books include Energy and Environment in the Transition Economies (Boulder: Westview Press, 2000); Carbon Emissions Control Strategies: Case Studies in International Cooperation (Washington: Conservation Foundation, 1990); State of the World, Lester Brown et al. (Vols. 1984-1988) (New York: W.W. Norton); The Myth of TVA: Conservation and Development in the Tennessee Valley, 1933-1983 (Cambridge, MA: Ballinger, 1983); and Energy: The Conservation Revolution (New York: Plenum, 1981), coauthored with John H. Gibbons. He has published widely in both technical and popular journals, has appeared on national radio and television, and testified frequently on energy and security issues in the U.S. Congress.

  3. Chandler’s international work has included institution building, project finance, and policy analysis. He led the creation of independent, not-for-profit energy efficiency centers in six nations, including Russia and China, drawing on support from governments and foundations; helped arrange financing of $1 billion in technology transfer projects in Russia, Ukraine, and China; and led several collaborations of international scientists in policy studies for the United Nations, the U.S. government, and U.S. private foundations. Chandler served as a member of the international energy panel of the U.S. President’s Council of Advisers on Science and Technology, and is a lead author for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

  4. Chandler’s earlier work concentrated on domestic U.S. energy and security policy. In 1988, he led a study involving 30 U.S. energy experts, resulting in the publication of Energy Efficiency: A New Agenda (Washington: American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, 1988). And in 1979, he collaborated with Daniel Yergin of Cambridge Energy Research Associates in organizing a project that led to publication of The Dependence Dilemma: Gasoline Consumption and America’s Security (Cambridge: Harvard Center for International Affairs, 1980). In 1988, he published “Assessing SDI,” a chapter in State of the World on ballistic missile defense, reflecting his study at Harvard University. Chandler continues to manage several international collaborations, including an energy-efficiency relationship between the U.S. and Russia under the “Energy Working Group”; the U.S.-Ukrainian collaborative program on energy-efficiency investment; and the Finance Committee for the U.S.-China Memorandum of Understanding on Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. He served as the chief technical adviser to the United Nations Development Program for a three-year effort to train Chinese government officials in energy security in a market economy, and has recently led an effort for the Blue Moon Fund to develop clean energy equity investment in China.

  5. Chandler received the 1992 Champion of Energy-Efficiency Award from the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy for his work. In 1999, he received the first Global Climate Leadership Award from the International Energy Agency. Chandler retired from Battelle in 2005 to create a new company to develop clean energy projects in transition economies. He holds a B.S. from the University of Tennessee and an M.P.A. from Harvard University.

  6. The Carnegie Moscow Center’s Program on Economic and Energy Policy explores the regional aspects of Russian oil and gas industry development, with a focus on relations between the federal center and regional energy projects. The Center also holds a regular forum to examine the role that science and technology can play in strengthening energy security in Russia and Eurasia. Key issues have included nuclear power, clean coal, and policy implications of warming in the Arctic.

  7. The Carnegie China Program in Washington, D.C. and Beijing and the World Resources Institute have established a joint project aimed to engage the key stakeholders in China on the issues of energy security and climate change. The project attempts to explore policy options to strengthen energy security through multilateral cooperation and efficiency improvement. Importantly, the project will examine the critical linkage between energy security and climate.

  8. The Carnegie Endowment for International Peace is a private, nonprofit organization dedicated to advancing cooperation between nations and promoting active international engagement by the United States. Founded in 1910, its work is nonpartisan and dedicated to achieving practical results. The Endowment has added operations in Beijing, Beirut, and Brussels to its longstanding offices in Washington and Moscow as part of its transformation into the first global think tank.